LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Monthly archive November, 2005

Suddenly aware of the precariousness of home

Oh the wonders. Had a little fun with this found object. For the record, every woman who passed by stopped to ew and ah, over the house. One man did too, but he just wanted to take a photo…

Film bites

Derrida, The Movie is not what you would expect. At least in terms of the filmmakers themselves who often seem a bit buffoonish. But Derrida is so incredibly charming and energetic it more than makes up for their clumsiness…a must see. In fact perhaps a must-own. Another must see is Capote, a gripping tale of...

Reading Notes, 1

O CidadanThe poem is love, is touching all ends simultaneouslyThe poet is stretched from shore          unmoooredReason is as reason does. Consider the event: poematicapoetry being the most unfiltered of art forms, the most awareof its own cost super 8 in a line lengthredundancy of script notesif love is deconstruction is it not also decreation? Can decreation...

Women Blogging Women

Back in September I posted a note that said I was likely going to end my blogging adventure. Clearly I have decided not to. There are a number of reasons why, but the most important one may be—dare I say it—a question of gender. Tired old dialogue that it is, I notice there are not...

Gertrude Stein was a Broad

Well, at least she had the swagger of one in her speech…check out the moves on this dufus reporter. Recorded at the Algonquin, and once more, thanks to ubu!

Inasmuch As It Is Always Already Taking Place, 1990

A day at Moma. This installation, by Gary Hill, which I stumbled upon on the way to the restrooms yesterday, was one of the highlights…complete report to come.

Bartleby the Scrivener

Who would have imagined Bartleby on stage? Smushed as I was in a corner, at the edge of the stage with a cold and a lap-full of cough drops and remembering the longish experience of wading through the story I had my concerns about the experiment. But it was for naught. R.L. Lane has adapted...

Journaling into Poetry

There are moments in Decreation where I hear Virginia Woolf’s acerbic wit slice across the page. This, the last stanza of GNOSTICISM IV, could be an entry from one of her journals: At the moment in the interminable dinner when Coetzee baskingicily across from you at the faculty table is all at oncethere like a...

Jeff Wall

Photographs by Jeff Wall, from Tate Modern Jeff Wall, Photographs 1978-2004 at the Tate ModernWall is one of my favourite photographers. He was the first photographer I encountered that broke traditional lines of composition, and the first that included non-glamorous, or rather, did not focus on traditionally beautiful characters. He was also the first photographer...

More on Virginia Woolf

This week’s New York Times book section featured a review of the new book by Julia Briggs–who was here in the city on Friday night and whom I planned on hearing but due to multiple events, didn’t make it to. In conjunction with the review the Times has posted the following resources. Quite an assemblage....

Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn

At the entrance to Prospect Park, and I suppose a much more dramatic version of Columbus Circle, Grand Army Plaza is, as the name suggests, grand. However, historians point out that the plaza is grander even than Olmsted and Vaux might have been comfortable with. The triumphal arc, a Civil War Memorial and added some...

Ron Silliman @ Bowery

Great reading yesterday at the Bowery. David Shapiro and Ron Silliman. The kind of reading you can only get after years of thinking, reading, writing, talking, reading–resonant, lush, completely unpretentious. Just straight-up good work. And Shapiro–my God, very, very funny. Here’s a recording of Silliman reading, as well as an interview by Amy King.

Gil Adamson & Shannon Bramer

Two writers I wouldn’t mind seeing more of, Adamson and Bramer have published consistently intriguing, dynamic work. Ashland, in some ways a feminist version of Ondaatje’s Collected Works of Billy the Kid, is an arresting, gritty read. From the title sequence: In survival dreams I am bullet-proof, running, I resemble a cave, I go through...

Quote of the week

In response to a question regarding the impact of French theories on the study of the humanities in America: That was the gift of the French. They gave Americans a language they did not need. It was like the Statue of Liberty. Nobody needs French theory. From Questions for Jean Baudrillard in the Sunday NY...

100 Most “Important” Canadian Books

The Literary Review of Canada, which until recently had Fred Wah as poetry editor—a fact that made me predisposed to liking it—has now published a list of the 100 Most Important Canadian Books. Why do we bother trying to fix such things? Worse, as one time sharp-toothed theatre critic turned novelist, Kate Taylor points out...

Wallace Shawn at Noho

He was ambling toward the door wearing the same green hunter’s jacket that he wore at the beginning of Vanya On 42nd Street and without thinking, both arms went up, There he is, I said, the God of theatre! Oh, he said, appearing to grow several inches in height as he came closer to the...

Zolf & Stephens at belladonna

As promised, a very brief note on the Rachel Zolf/Nathalie Stephens reading at Dixon Place. I’ve had the pleasure of reading some of Zolf’s Human Resources—a work in progress—and it was impressive on paper, but hearing it, even more so. One becomes aware of the many notes she strikes. Humorous and biting, she exhausts HR...

Book I’m looking most forward to reading over the holidays

Shift & Switch: New Canadian Poetry is a new antholgoy from derek beaulieu, Jason Christie & Angela Rawlings. Despite the obvious flaw of not including yours truly, this looks like a promising line up. I’m curious to see not only the choices, but how they work together. But guys, why make a big deal of...

Bat Barbie

After a whirlwind of righting wrongs the world over, Bat Barbie takes a moment to reflect on the shores of Toronto Island.

Overheard Dialogue of the Week

If I bought that I’d have to buy a new house… Don’t you have an empty wall in your Florida house? Which Florida house?

Chelsea November

Detail: Rachel Whiteread’s Chess Set at Luhring Augustine There were so many great shows in on 24th Street this week that I could hardly have paid enough attention to each, and skipped anything that was not on the first floor. There were two shows examining text in art, photography from André Kertész, a multimedia extravaganza...

Structural Articulations: Caroline Bergvall’s Fig

Fig is the latest from Caroline Bergvall, one of the poets who keep me blissfully reaching beyond my comfort zones. Bergvall is a London based text and sound poet of French-Norwegian nationalities. Her text pieces and collaborations have been produced internationally. I first stumbled upon her work on the nthposition website, and then heard her...

Stay Tuned

… for more handcrafted pieces including another Chelsea round-up sizzling with Rachel Whiteread and Damien Hirst, Basquiat and Warhol; a note on Nathalie Stephens and Rachel Zolf’s belladonna reading, and observations on the poetry of Scott Hightower and David Groff. All this and more. Oh, and news about the Atlantic Avenue developments.

More on Red Robot

Turns out there are many robots available at City Foundry, and they’re made by a guy named Gordon Bennett, who crafts them out of found objects and materials–wood, bakelight, glass, rubber. The size is what makes them, and the recognizable pieces of technology too: the camera head on a projector body, the fire alarm body...

More Day in the Life of Brooklyn

Ongoing documentation of my neighbourhood in Brooklyn. I live about two blocks from the Atlantic Yards. The site of one of the most contested and potentially devestating/lucrative developments Brooklyn has seen in a century or so. The changes are rapid. Softskull Books used to be on the corner, now there’s a showroom for luxury condos–already...

Hinterland Who’s Who

Why not find out more about Canadian Wildlife? For a more complete story, click here. I’ve posted this before, but you know you can never have enough information about the beaver.

Overheard dialogue of the week

“I mean I know this class isn’t high on her list of priorities, but I have things to do too, and I have to give them up, so you know, she should at least be prepared…”“Yah, or at least dress properly.”

More on Woolf’s childhood

I look forward to the following publication being one who is extremely curious about the state of childhood on the life of writers—among all folks really. What I wouldn’t give to find a similar stash of writing from Gertrude Stein. I would spend the next decade comparing notes. Hyde Park Gate News VANESSA CURTIS Gill...

MORE CANADIAN POETRY

Belladonna Welcomes Nathalie Stephens & Rachel Zolf Tuesday, November 8, 7PM @ Dixon Place (258 Bowery, 2nd Floor—Between Houston & Prince) Admission is $5 at the Door. Nathalie Stephens writes in English and French, and sometimes neither. Writing l’entre-genre, she is the author of several published works, most recently L’Injure (l’Hexagone, 2004), Paper City (Coach House, 2003),...

Lisa Robertson, Office for Soft Architecture

Office for Soft Architecture I’ve spent an hour this morning in Vancouver. Wonderful to pick up a book, in this case Lisa Robertson’s Office for Soft Architecture, and be transported to the musings and meanderings of one’s former life, especially when that author gives one new language, a sharper angle. From her meditation on Rubus...

Link of the week

Photo from Hickock’s website This week’s prize goes to Elizabeth Hickock of San Fransisco for her JELLO scale model of San Fransico. Yes, she made evey building in Jello. Oh, and do check out the little earthquake video that goes with it. Very funny.