LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Monthly archive May, 2006

The Hound reads with Nicole Brossard

Nicole Brossard launches Fluid Arguments, a book of essays, and the paperback edition of the GG-nominated Yesterday, at the Hotel Clarendon. With readings by Susan Rudy and Sina Queyras. At This Ain’t the Rosedale Library (483 Church St., Toronto). May 30th, 7:30 pm.

Eva Hesse

There are two Eva Hesse shows on in New York at the moment, one at the Drawing Center, and one at the Jewish Museum.

Andrea Zittel

Critical Space, now on at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, is Andrea Zittel’s first major show. For over a decade she has been investigating “lifestyle” with more intensity than the average scientific mind. In fact, Zittel might be to “domesticity,” what Serra is to a steelworker: the far end of the imagined possibility. Beds...

Richard Serra, The Gagosian

Richard Serra is one of the giants of contemporary art, and regularly shows new work at The Gagosian. This latest is more fragmented than the last show I saw: a sculpture tall and curved as the bulk of a ship–one of those lonely rusted ships Edward Burtynsky photographs. I still don’t know how they got...

Kitchen Stories

Loved this. It’s a terrible trailer (movie trailer, the trailers in the movie are excellent…), but the movie is fantastic.

Lisa Robertson, The Men: A Lyric Poem

Lisa Robertson and Carol Mirakove closed the Segue Reading Series at the Bowery on Saturday, and what a finale it was. I had never heard Mirakove before, and will definitely watch out for her work. Robertson on the other hand, I’ve heard several times, and always with pleasure. Her latest offering, The Men, is vintage...

Tonya Foster

Tonya Foster, co-curator of Seque, introduced Carole Mirakove, and herself as it turns out. I knew nothing of her, but was taken by the thoughtful, precise introduction. Wonderful energy, and wonderful poetry. You can hear Foster read here.

Excerpt from Lemon Hound

At Ukula, a new site. Check it out.

Andrea Zittel

A busy, busy week, but posts on Eva Hesse, Andrea Zittel (thanks Stacy Szymaszek), and Richard Serra to come.

Silliman on belladonna

Yay! belladonna is the coolest.

Robertson in town!

The Segue Reading Series @ the Bowery Poetry Club Saturday, May 20, 4-6 p.m. CAROL MIRAKOVE and LISA ROBERTSON ***$6 admission goes to support the readers***The Bowery Poetry Club is located at 308 Bowery, just north of Houston Carol Mirakove is the author of Mediated (Factory School) and Occupied (Kelsey St. Press) as well as...

Rae Armantrout in the New Yorker

Are others as surprised as I am? Really, have we slipped into a parallel universe? It isn’t online, but the contents are…

The city is movement

“This city is beauty,” Dionne Brand says in Thirsty. In fact it is the first line of the book. Here is the first stanza: This city is beautyunbreakable and amorous as eyelids,in the streets, pressed with fierce departures,submerged landings,I am innocent in thresholdsand smashed night birds, lovesick,as empty elevators Hear Brand read from Thirsty. I...

Delancey on a rainy day….

Over at Kate Greenstreet’s place there is a new interview up. This time Jen Benka, whom I discussed here earlier.

Mark Truscott

I’ve been loving Said Like Reeds or Things by Mark Truscott for a while now, and wanting to post something more like a review, but, but, but, the time, and pressures of otherwise…let’s face it, thoughtful reviewing takes time. So, I hereby announce the blog review, a postcard review, anecdotal, informal, succinct (as possible). What...

Zohar

Here’s a visual poem from Zohar, one of my new favorite people in New York. And here’s a link to her website. Check out the videos: Fly and Motion are two of my favourites.

lists, lists and more lists

Much ado about the list of important books, or best books published (in the last 25 years) in the NY Times recently and which Silliman posted today. The problem with all such lists is that those who make them feel absolutely entitled to call them grand things like “Best American” or “Most important Canadian” never...

Million Poems Show

Well, I had to check it out, never having seen the show, and only ever seeing Jordan Davis in passing, and being a general fan, in general of his project, and poems and photos I was not disappointed. What a hoot. What Genius. A poetry talk show. There are those who should feel threatened by...

The positive power of blogging

I have been impressed with the way the poetry community in Canada has called out certain behaviours as unacceptable. The rallying around a. rawlings has been refreshing, humbling even. Part of the reason I have continued to blog, though I am often at the brink of calling it off, is that I grow tired of...

Michael Turner

Can we still call Michael Turner the west coast’s bad boy poet?According to this amazing photo by Vancouver photographer Alex Waterhouse-Hayward, we damn well should be able to. Loved Turner’s Kingsway (find an excerpt here), and Hard Core Logo. Whatever happened to The Pornographer’s Poem, which Soft Skull picked up for US publication?? Anyone check...

The Hound on Bergvall

Review of Caroline Bergvall’s Fig in May’s Brooklyn Rail, and now online.

Jordan Davis on Lemon Hound

Okay, so, I’m chuffed…and well, chuffed. The Constant Critic gives the Hound some love…thanks Jordan. AND wow to tonight’s triple-play. Laynie Brown, Marjorie Welish, and Rae Armantrout rocked Dixon Place to full capacity. Chapbooks available from belladonna.blogspot.com. Can you believe so many rocking women reading in one night? You see why belladonna is the baddest...

Lourdes Vazquez

I heard Lourdes Vazquez read for the first time last night, at Zinc Bar, and she was incredible–she read the original, Erica Kaufman the translations. I’m so glad I found this poem online to share with you because it was my favorite of the night. You can find it at www.tribes.org–sorry, I’m having trouble with...

Rae Armantrout, Laynie Browne, & Marjorie Welish

Tuesday, May 9, 7PM@ Dixon Place (258 Bowery, 2nd Floor—Between Houston & Prince)Admission is $5 at the Door.Rae Armantrout’s most recent books are Up to Speed (Wesleyan, 2004), The Pretext (Green Integer, 2001), and Veil: New and Selected Poems (Wesleyan University Press, 2001). Les Cahiers de Royaumont published a volume of selected poems, Couverture, translated...

Water, Deepa Mehta

The second in her trilogy, Water, is even more powerful than Fire, the first installation released nearly a decade ago. A slant remake of Romeo & Juliet based in Varanasi at the time of Ghandi’s release from prison, the story of Chuyia, the seven year old widow sent to a widow’s ashram, is utterly transporting....

Sheila Heti on Ticknor

I can’t strictly recommend this podcast, but I can recommend anything Sheila Heti-ish, and there she is, talking about the creation of Ticknor. But you can read The Littlest Dumpling, from The Middle Stories.

New bp Nichol sound files

New Nichol sound files up at Penn sound. I know those links for Welish that I posted this morning aren’t working. I’ve sent an email. Hopefully they’ll work soon… Meanwhile, check out the new Nichol.**That was quick! Check back next week for the Welish sound files.**

Marjorie Welish

Thinking about the poet Marjorie Welish, whom I met this week, and whom I will introduced Tuesday when she reads for belladonna (don’t miss this!). Educator, critic, ARTIST, Welish is one of the most exciting poets I’ve come across in a long time. Her mind is active on the page, a great, imaginative, analytical lyric...

Every Other Day & First Book Interviews

Ooops! Stacy Szymaszek isn’t the first of the first book interview over at Kate Greenstreet’s Every Other Day. You’ll find Shana Compton‘s interview here. There are a number of folks who it would be good to hear from: Jen Benka, for instance, a. rawlings–a great first book out from Coach House this spring–Rachel Levitsky. Many...

Theory of the Loser Class

There’s so much to love about the latest installation of Jon Paul Fiorentino’s exploration of the loser. I love this project. How infinitely refreshing. So much of our energy spent polishing, posing, projecting confidence and perfectability…not that the book isn’t coiffed and polished, but its articulation of our anxiety, with the stranglehold of form and...

Chicago Review takes a look at Lisa Robertson

Insightful essays by Joshua Clover, Jen Scappettone, and others; new work; an interview! Well worth tracking down.

Every Other Day

Kate Greenstreet, who has her own first book coming out this fall, has started interviewing poets about their experience with first books. Stacy Szymaszek, whose first book I discussed a while back, is the first up. Her book is great, so you should read it, but you could start by reading the interview. The first...

Comments, why bother?

I’ve had a few emails asking me why I don’t have my comments turned on. I said I would consider turning them on again, but recent events at a few blogs remind me why I turned them off in the first place. You’d think people who purport to care about language might think about the...

Janieta Eyre

Surely one of the most interesting photographers in the past decade, Janieta Eyre, like the brainchild of Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman, creates portraits that are as disturbing as they are compelling. The Lady Lazarus series is particularly compelling in its handmaiden-meets-lomo sort of look. What is it about women and self-portraiture? There is something...

The Power Plant, Toronto

Kudos to Toronto’s Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery for two great shows this spring.The Welfare Show is billed as “a multi-tiered installation and performance work that offers a provocative commentary on the erosion of social welfare programs throughout the world.” Babies left at ATMs, doors leading nowhere, bodies on stretchers in hallways, a baggage carousel...

Dominion takes a look at Lemon Hound

A fine way to start the month of May…

Landing, Newark

“I’m not interested in in casting material but in art that’s made out of casting a glance…”– Robert Smithson For every development “there has to be something equally monumental in the landscape where we have taken all this material from. I felt that Newtonian law implied a reciprocal action in nature–a hole in the ground...

Central Park, Saturday

Last day of April

A fulsome Sunday in the city. Starting with a less-than-thrilling opera, Miss Lonely Hearts, at The Julliard, then a party for a short-short film based on Jeanne Beaumont’s wonderful poem “Afraid So,” which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival, followed by Queer Ink, at the Bowery, and ending with a launch of New Translations of...