LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Monthly archive May, 2007

Alice Notley, Part 1

Alice Notley has had a few very big years. Recent publications include a collection of essays, Coming After (U of Michigan 2005), Grave of Light: New and Selected Poems, 1970-2005 (Wesleyan 2006), and Alma, Or The Dead Women (Granary 2006). I’ve been wanting to write about the new and selected for some time now, but...

Who sees Canada?

I’ve been curating this pool of Canadian photography on flickr. Early days still, but it’s worth a look. How’s that for a ringing endorsement? You could try listening to that with a podcast from CBC Radio 3. Or a special podcast on the Canadian dictionary, eh.

Laugh of the week

Oh, I did need a laugh this morning…and out takes. or George Bush on global warming.

Ya, funny, funny.

Environmental news of the week

Wow. If poetry could do this. Think about the other “90 %” of the planet. I would love to see the Haida give the oil patch a run for its money. When I heard about plans to put solar panels on farm land in Ontario I couldn’t believe it…who would okay such a plan? Solar...

Million Poems Show Bowery Poetry Club

The Hound will be one of tonight’s guests. “For the finale of season three for New York’s best-loved poetry talk show, host Jordan Davis and house band Franklin Bruno (The Human Hearts, Nothing Painted Blue, Mountain Goats) welcome poets Sina Queyras and Chris Toll, and cabaret sensation Poor Baby Bree. Interviews, poetry, performance, spontaneous collaboration...

Joshua Clover, The Totality for Kids

I posted briefly on Joshua Clover in my Three Joshuas (Beckman, Clover, Corey) mini-review last year. I was taken with Clover’s The Totality for Kids, and wanted to spend more time with it before going on at length. Partly this is because I want to resist being taken in by the sheen, and by the...

“Moments” now on ars poetica. Thanks, Dan. Great project compiling poems that reflect a poet’s poetics.

Grizzly Man is George Bush

Finally watched Grizzly Man, the Werner Herzog docu/film depicting the life of Timothy Treadwell. Well, that is to say I watched what I could–long descriptions of body parts didn’t seem that interesting, and it was painful to watch someone as delusional as Treadwell, who, like the McCandless we encounter in Jon Krakaeur’s Into the Wild...

here again…

Thoughts on blogging once more

After several months of “not blogging,” it seemed clear to me that blogging had become a fairly significant part of my life. This is, to me, a bit sobering, because it means that I’m content to have a one-sided convers

Quote of the week

I don’t have a problem with lyric poetry. I have a problem with the idea that lyric poetry is the only legitimate poetry….

best poet of his or her generation

I’ve come across this statement several times in the past year, once as a self-description. Speaking of oneself in the third person–so and so is the the best poet of her generation. I don’t understand this sort of language. I don’t understand how it is useful in any context, review or blog. Likely I have...

Mairead Byrne, Talk Poetry (Miami UP 2007)

“You could use this stuff for stand-up and STILL have enough leftovers to construct a small working Christopher Marlowe…” Jow Lindsay I have long been a fan of Mairéad Byrne, a poet who is as funny as she is brave and original. We first crossed paths electronically, where she proved herself to be a tireless...

Sicko: Michael Moore takes on US Healthcare

Oh, this is going to be good. Taking a group of 9/11 rescue workers to Cuba for free health care? Moore was right to spirit away a copy of the film. This was a deal breaker for me: living in a country that allows its citizens to go bankrupt over basic health care? That’s insane....

Even more on the difference between poetry & prose

People seem to get very worried when poetry becomes too prose-like, or prose becomes too poetry-like. The latter seems particularly worrisome, but usually because this tends to describe “bad writing,” rather than poetic prose. I won’t cite examples…but there are many. The difference is fascinating if only because of the reaction people have to being...

wherever she goes, there she is

Haverford College Library

guess where?

In which the hound reveals a soft spot for cats…

Particularly intelligent ones… Nora… the sequel

More to come on Andreas Gursky

Spring in Chelsea…no windows…no doors…art spilling out everywhere.

The Hound in Montreal, Verse on LH

Sina Queyras, author of Lemon Hound (shortlisted for a Lambda Literary Award and the Pat Lowther Award), reads at Montreal’s Atwater Poetry Project, and is joined by Sonnet L’Abbe and Ida Borjel. The Atwater Poetry Projectfeaturing Sina Queyras, Sonnet L’Abbe and Ida BorjelThursday, May 10, 2007Atwater Library & Computer Centre, 1200 Atwater AvenueWestmount, QC7:00 p.m....

Sammy Davis Jr.

Who knew. The guy was a life-time camera-carrying photography addict…

Looking at looking at art

These two were consummate lookers. I was compelled to look at their looking with as much intensity. Chelsea is at least as much about the lookers as it is the art. So many people looking gives an artist such hope, I think. There is interest when so much of an artist’s life is about non-interest,...

Podcasts and author audio files

A few of my heroes:Margaret AtwoodAnne CarsonSusan SontagAlice NotleyCD WrightSusuan HoweLyn HejinianToni MorrisonCaroline Bergvall’s Chaucer…and some interesting others including Deborah Eisenberg, David Foster Wallace, Edward Said, Seamus Heaney, and you’ve probably heard Martin Amis read, but if you haven’t, voila. And check out the Atwater Reading Series where you can hear Erin Moure, Fred Wah,...

Childhood landscapes #16

Making The New Lamb Take

No pastoral poetry is complete without a lamb, and in the poetry of Gabe Fried we find that lamb, and that field, front and center. Achingly exquisite with formal splendor, Fried’s poems echo Thomas Hardy, or that American school of quietude that harkens back to a time of less media and cultural saturation and disconnection....

Go Sarah!

Sarah Polley the actress has become Sarah Polley the director, and for her first feature she has chosen to transform an Alice Munro story. Gutsy move, and it seems to be paying off: AO Scott calls it near perfect. This is just the thing I needed, a new woman directing films. I have no desire...

Looking for, and Resisting, Diane Arbus

I posted on Diane Arbus very briefly after seeing her show at the Met, and after seeing a show in Chelsea. Briefly I suppose because despite her dual giantess status in both feminist and photography worlds, I’m still not sure what to say about her. The prolific photographer worked extensively in the 50s and 60s, publishing...

Don McKay

Song for the Song of the White-throated Sparrow Before it can stop itself, the mindhas leapt up inferences, crag to crag,the obvious arpeggio. Where there is a doorbellthere must be a door–a doormeant to be opened from inside.Door means house means–wait a second–but already it is standing on a threshold previouslyknown to be thin air,...

Takashi Murakami

Tranquility Of The HeartTorment of the Flesh-OpenWide The Eye Of The Heart,And Nothing Is InvisibleGagosian950 Madison AvenueMay 1-June 9, 2007 Am I ready for another Murakami extravaganza? I discovered this artist at the Venice Bienale and found it playful, extremely energetic and shamefully engaged with the momentary sheen of popular culture. I saw the video...

Seminal: The Anthology of Canada’s Gay Male Poets

Launching on May 10th in Vancouver, published by Arsenal and co-edited by John Barton & Billeh Nickerson, this is a welcome text and I wish I could be there to celebrate. While reading for Open Field I was struck by how few gay male poets we have in Canada–gay male playwrights, many of them, many...

Bookish landscapes, Magill Library lobby, Haverford

Catherine Kidd

The awesome and singular Montreal author Catherine Kidd, whose “Blue Orb” appeared on Drunken Boat last fall, has a new novel out with Andy Brown’s upstart press. She was recently profiled in Canada’s Quill & Quire.

Andreas Gursky at Matthew Marks

Panoramas, bird’s eye views, the single largest photograph in the world containing 80,000 brightly dressed gymnasts, a chain of islands, or lines of asparagus plants…the sheer amount of modernity is killing us. Perhaps the unwieldiness is what compels photographer Andreas Gursky, featured in April’s issue of Modern Painters, and on view soon at Matthew Marks....

Jessica Lange’s photographs in Aperture

Who knew? Photographer Mary Ellen Mark introduces the photography of the famous actress and spouse of Sam Shepard in the spring issue, and they aren’t bad. They are moody black and whites of small town America–full of subtext of course, and sort of steamy.