As long as the title is clearly connected to the mid-section of the poem. As long as the eating of people is clearly a metaphor. As long as the idea of human longing is signaled early, best in the first stanza. As long as the question “What do you love?” appears. As long as there is a sense of “teasing” disunity, not too teasing though. As long as “My” and “I” appear with minimal irony. As long as the reader is constantly reminded they are human, their longing is human, and given a glass of wine, a Rusty Nail, anything in stemware, they will be fine by the end of the poem. As long as intestines aren’t the end of the poem, as long as we don’t spend too long on on illness. As long as the doctor’s appearance is not expressly for the speaker of the poem, rather say, for a brother. As long as their aren’t too many specific contemporary cultural references (after all the poem is a transporter not a mirror). As long as abstract ideas are minimal, as long as metaphor is present and doesn’t stretch the imagination too far. A long as God appears (or his intestine), and at least one exclamation mark. As long as the poem ties everything together in the end. As long as there is only a residue of thinking after the event of the poem. As long as the wonder lasts only as long as turning the page. As long as it contains the word “miracles,” and better if it ends there. Yes, best if it ends there.

Another here…it seems we are back to the question of the avant lyric poem.