LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Monthly archive February, 2010

Sachiko Murakami: No sense is good sense

I’m at home, sick, feeling rather sorry for myself and not having much of a phenomenal blog post in me. To cheer myself up, I am watching this over and over again. Trust me, it is extremely relevant to contemporary poetry. Oll raigth! — Sachiko Murakami wrote The Invisibility Exhibit. You can read new poems...

Literary Sleaze (Part 2 of 3)

One of the most time honoured sleazy stereotypes about writers has something to do with a dark, dank pub and a bottle of whiskey. High-profile bingers like Dylan Thomas have done much to cement this ‘drunk as a poet on payday’ image. For some contemporary evidence of writerly drunkenness, keep an eye out for Matrix...

Up to the Aether (guest post by Kaplan Harris)

I adore when poets & scholars devote themselves to making available the work of some elder poet. I’m thinking of Peter Gizzi’s The House that Jack Built: The Collected Lectures of Jack Spicer, Kristin Prevallet’s Helen Adam Reader, Kevin Davies & Larry Fagin’s edition of George Stanley’s A Tall, Serious Girl: Selected Poems 1957-2000, &...

Nikki Reimer: Olympics, Still

Was going to write about poetry for a change this week but I’ve prorogued that post in favour of a continued rumination on the 2010 Winter Festival Thing, and more talk about Olympicism and Art. Yesterday we attended the live taping of CBC’s Cross Country Checkup, where the topic was Olympic fever. “For years Canada’s...

Lemon Hound Heads West

February 23, 2010 – 7:30pm Feb 23 | Sina Queyras in Victoria public reading with Sina Queyras, author of ExpresswayTuesday, February 23Open Space510 Fort Street, 2nd floor7:30 p.m., freeVisit www.openspace.ca February 25, 2010 – 7:00pm Rhizome Cafe, 317 East Broadway, Vancouver, BC  Sina Queyras in Vancouver Sina Queyras (Expressway) will join Lydia Kwa (The Walking...

On Reviewing: Carol Matthews

LH: What do you think the purpose of a review is? If you also write about books on a blog, why? What does blogging let you do differently? CM: When I write a review, I want to give readers a glimpse of the texture and perspective of a book, let them know why the book...

Anthologies and feminisms: are we having a moment or what?

If you found Juliana Spahr and Claudia Rankine’s American Women Poets in the 21st Century: Where Lyric Meets Language exciting you’re going to appreciate Prismatic Publics: Innovative Canadian Women’s Poetry, published in 2009 by Coach House Books. Edited superbly by Kate Eichhorn and Heath Milne, the collection includes fifteen of the “most engaging avante garde...

I eat Corporations

Grace Jones

Under Rich Earth

I haven’t seen Avatar yet, but I have seen Under Rich Earth, which quite frankly, seems to be the story Avatar is based on… Must see it. An amazing story of Ecuadoran farmers in a valley fighting for their lives, and the life of the valley. So far it has an actual, working, believable, happy...

Sachiko Murakami – oh, lymphic poetry

It’s strange, but I almost wish I were back in Vancouver. I’ve been working on a poetry manuscript for some time about Vancouver’s conception of itself – the vague, frantic rhetoric of the World Class City, the rapid building up and tearing down that’s happened over the past century, the strange relationship it has with...

Literary Sleaze (Part 1 of 3)

Schnakenberg, Robert. Secret Lives of Great Authors: What Your Teachers Never Told You About Famous Novelists, Poets, and Playwrights. Philadelphia: Quirk Books, 2008. Alright—admit it. You’ve completed an English degree or two, you’ve read at least one James Joyce book from cover to cover, and you’ve never so much as scanned the jacket of a...

Recent Stack – Six books / chapbooks

The i.e. Reader | ed. Michael Ball, with Lauren Bender, Jamie Gaughran-Perez, & Justin Sirois | Narrow House | 2009When I lived in DC, I would sometimes hop up to Baltimore to attend the i.e. readings curated by the amazing Michael Ball. See the review by Mark Wallace here. The book is dedicated to kari...

Nikki Reimer: On Expo Ernie & the Candahar Bar

It’s day three of the 2010 Winter Olympic Games here in Vancouver (can I type that without running afoul of copyright infringement?). I’m nursing a nascent cold that might have been picked up from too much carousing on opening night. Here’s what I’ve seen so far. The spectre of protest vs. celebration has friends at...

Speaking of Love, from Greece to Lotusland

Greece, the country where the games were born, was the first country to enter BC Place Stadium in Vancouver last night for the opening of the Winter Olympics. The ceremonies included Canada’s first people, and while it was a Disneyfied version of their rich cultures, and far from the Ancient Games, I was happy for...

Contemplation is Mourning: Tim Lilburn

Contemplation is Mourning: Tim Lilburn “Wilderness can be enacted in language, but as it is enacted, language begins to seem less and less like language…[1]” Tim Lilburn is a contemplative poet, a deep reader and thinker, a poet in the tradition of “you give your life” to the project. In his attempt to come to...

Sachiko Murakami – Brad Cran FTW

Brad Cran, Vancouver Poet Laureate, did a very admirable thing yesterday, speaking out against VANOC censorship and speaking up for the arts. Given that the Laureateship (?) is a joint project of the City of Vancouver, the Vancouver Public Library (who have shown quite clearly how they, custodians of knowledge, deal with VANOC censorship), and...

Mentor, Tormentor (Part 3 of 3)

Check out the making of Stripmalling in The Way of the Smock: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GxYOWNtFfI&feature=related For the last installment of ‘Mentor, Tormentor,’ I am please to introduce you to the stoned, sweaty, self-conscious book in the corner wearing the Hypermart smock—Jon Paul Fiorentino’s Stripmalling. Stripmalling is a quirky book chronicling the life of Jonny, a Shill Station...

Some notes on The Fashion Show Poetry Event (1969) – Kaplan Harris

The Fashion Show Poetry Event was organized by Hannah Weiner, Eduardo Costa, & John Perreault in 1969. It took place at the Center for Inter-American Relations on Park Avenue & featured dresses & costumes designed by Alex Katz, Marisol Escobar, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, & more than a dozen other artists.Several poets were enlisted to...

Nikki Reimer: Digital Nation, Poetry Nation

Part One:Two weeks ago I had an acute attack of depression and anxiety. Having returned to a (mostly) rational state of mind, I’ve been attempting to parse out the causes of the problem, and I think my penchant for late-night multi-window internetting may be partly to blame. While I was thinking about this, I came...

On Reviewing: Michael Scharf

LH: What do you think the purpose of a review is? If you also writeabout books on a blog, why? What does blogging let you do differently? MS: Reviews make a work’s meanings manifest in a propositionalform–i.e. a form that’s easier to argue about. Reviews are also like amplifiers. They process the signal and changeits...

Writing is never Wasted

Just posted this in the comments box over at Harriet, under Bhanu Kapil’s post “Dung & Glitter“ Writing is never wasted. I tell my students this, urging them to throw away a draft and start again…difficult to do, to trust. I have variously taken drafts and burned them, tore them into tiny shreds, let them...

Jake Kennedy: Notes on NourbeSe’s “Zong! #11”

suppose the law                                                 is       not               does       not             would       not       be       not         suppose the law not         —a crime        suppose the law a loss        suppose the law        suppose   _______________________________________          Nomble   Falope   Bisuga   Nuru   Chimwala   Sala  from, Zong! by M. NourbeSe Philip Zong! is M. NourbeSe Philip’s seven-year-in-construction...

On Reviewing: derek beaulieu

I think it’s a poet’s responsibility to review books. As writers, we have committed ourselves to taking part in a dialogue, a discussion about art, and as such its our responsibility to review other books – to look at and write about other writer’s work – in order to further a discussion of the role...

Mentor, Tormentor (Part 2 of 3)

Mean Boy, by Lynn Coady, may cause you some embarrassment if read in public. This is mainly because of the intense, gasping, hyena-like laughing fits it induces in inappropriate places where you thought it would be perfectly safe to read a book, such as on the bus, in the library, or alone in a coffee...

The Big Night Menu: Geoffrey Gatza Talks Food & Poetry

In September 2009, the literary center Just Buffalo inaugurated the Big Night series which features “poetry, food, music, visual art, film, video & whatever else we can think of.” Mike Kelleher & Aaron Lowinger curate the monthly series, & Geoffrey Gatza prepares the food. I got a chance to ask Gatza some questions about the...

Nikki Reimer: Negotiating the Social Bond of Poetics with Jules Boykoff & Kaia Sand

This past half-year, I’ve teamed up with Lacanian scholar Dr. Nancy Gillespie to produce the KSW reading & workshop series “Negotiating the Social Bond of Poetics.” (Read the thematic abstract here.) We’ve been fortunate to host Peter Jaeger, Steve McCaffery, David Marriott, and most recently, Portland’s Kaia Sand & Jules Boykoff. {Please note that my...

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