….all Canadian poets of merit are awarded a large annual stipend. We got universal health care; we keep our poets fed. Our top ranking poets are granted official government positions. Like Neruda, we get to be ambassadors and attaches and that sort of stuff…

Seriously. I found that comment in the box after Jim Behrle’s piece on the Poetry Foundation a while back. Behrle’s piece is very relevant, I might add, and I think particularly relevant to the kind of posturing that goes on in comment streams, something Brenda Schmidt muses on here… and I would argue that this is also true for rhetorical strategies...

There is so little at stake in the poetry world that it all seems a bit ridiculous, but nonetheless, it’s there. I agree with Rhea Tregebov that health care and quality of life are basically like having a minimum income, but her statement above really made me shake my head. Really? “all Canadian poets of merit…”

This may be satire. I may not have read the tone well. Here’s the entire comment:

On March 11, 2010 at 7:33 pm Rhea Tregebov wrote:
Mr. Behrle’s article makes me grateful that I live in Canada where writing programs are scarcer and, as a consequence, competition sparser. As a consequence, all Canadian poets of merit are awarded a large annual stipend. We got universal health care; we keep our poets fed. Our top ranking poets are granted official government positions. Like Neruda, we get to be ambassadors and attaches and that sort of stuff. I know you’ve now got Obama, but our doors are still open to those desperate to escape. Come on up north. (We play hockey better too.)

Love this advice too:

I’ll bet Mary Oliver outsells everyone
including Jewel!! The secret? Don’t use big
words and soak your poems in sugar-
water.
Diana Manister