LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Author Archive
On Reading & Reviewing: Anita Lahey

On Reading & Reviewing: Anita Lahey

When I was editing poetry reviews for Arc Poetry Magazine, I had my radar tuned for pieces that were mean-spirited, careless or just plain blind. These sins, however, were rare, and when caught (usually) easily addressed. What troubled me more was reticence, reserve—any smokescreen cloaking the reviewer’s true feelings. I believe a review should offer...
In Conversation: Ben Fama & Kate Durbin

In Conversation: Ben Fama & Kate Durbin

Ben Fama: I want to start by asking about something that occurred several months ago on the Hyperallergic site. You’d co-written The Teen-Girl Tumblr Aesthetic, an article about tumblr users who display an aesthetic that is “immediate, hyper-embodied, raw and vulnerable,” tying it to the recent death of tumblr user Elisa Lam, who drowned in...
Alex Porco: Alice Burdick's Notebooks

Alex Porco: Alice Burdick’s Notebooks

Alice Burdick’s Notebooks: A Gallery [Note: during the summer of 2013, Canadian poet Alice Burdick shared her personal “notebooks” with me. These notebooks cover the period between 1991 and 2003. They include doodles, drawings, portraits, collages, as well as early drafts and fragments of poems. The following gallery of images showcases a small yet representative...

Maureen Latta: Moon Boy

The whole evening felt off. Right from the start. Trace’s townhouse is across the street from my house, a few blocks toward Cataraqui mall. And, this evening, her stepfather answers the door. Trace’s stepdad is usually up north working on a pipeline, which is fine with Trace because she hates him. Simple as that. Hates....
Rachel Careau: Four Fictions

Rachel Careau: Four Fictions

Anatomy Lesson On November 29 the remains of a pigeon lie along the path of my morning walk—the wings, the spine, two crabbed feet, other inedible parts. Between November 27 and December 24 they lie one day to the right of the path, the next to the left, and the next again to the right....
Catherine Bush: Accusation

Catherine Bush: Accusation

from Accusation, Goose Lane Editions, 2013. What am I supposed to do, he shouted.  His voice dropped, contrite.  I’m sorry.  Raymond Renaud’s hand reached out across the car, as if to touch Sara’s arm, before skidding away.  Behind the wheel, steering the car through the night, she had a sudden image of Raymond flying through the...
Etgar Keret: Cramps

Etgar Keret: Cramps

That night I dreamt that I was a forty-year old woman, and my husband was a retired colonel. He was running a community center in a poor neighborhood, and his social skills were shit. His workers hated him, because he kept yelling at them. They complained that he treated them like they were in basic...
Ken Babstock on Paul Muldoon

Ken Babstock on Paul Muldoon

HOW POEMS WORK KEN BABSTOCK   Hay By Paul Muldoon   This much I know. Just as I’m about to make that right turn off Province Line Road I meet another beat-up Volvo carrying a load   of hay. (More accurately, a bale of lucerne on the roof rack, a bale of lucerne or fescue...
Ken Babstock on Glyn Maxwell

Ken Babstock on Glyn Maxwell

PORTOBELLO by Glyn Maxwell When you were the one reading My palm, in the second hour of our one life, And I, sitting back for good and noticing white stuff Suddenly falling on Portobello and staying, You couldn’t for all the books in the world have learned More than one watching us, Who buttered his...
Ken Babstock on Helen Humphreys

Ken Babstock on Helen Humphreys

Installation BY HELEN HUMPHREYS What we make doesn’t recover from us. Twisted scaffold, trellis of rust. This is how we will be gone. The steel hull grinning with rivets. Shiny notes of chrome swinging from the stave of the wrecker’s wall. Those we loved and nothing for that. The moon a chalk circle over dark...
How Poems Work: Ken Babstock on David O'Meara

How Poems Work: Ken Babstock on David O’Meara

Field-Crossing by DAVID O’MEARA The clover’s razed; the ground is autumn-hard. The land bristles in a ragged frame. I’m on the far end, watching weightless clouds hastened by wind, the day dark but huge with a muscled rustling. A hydro pole impales the midriff of the field — a world-tree ripe with announcements; a pivot staking...
Heather Cromarty: on Pain Porn and Complicity

Heather Cromarty: on Pain Porn and Complicity

While reading Pain, Porn and Complicity my mind kept returning to that bizarre Stephen Marche interview of Megan Fox in Esquire.  It was mysteriously bad.  It was doesn’t-make-sense bad.  At the time I thought Marche had played his hand early on in the piece, when he wrote “the symmetry of her face, up close, is...
Michael Crummey: Two Poems

Michael Crummey: Two Poems

COCK TEASE She had a raw mouth for twelve, barely-there breasts and a name that made her reckless and surly by turns. She liked to be touched and could see it might be her undoing, she fended off advances with savage fatalism or shifted just out of reach like a sunbather avoiding a creeping block...
Ken Babstock on Les Murray

Ken Babstock on Les Murray

PIGS by Les Murray Us all on sore cement was we. Not warmed then with glares. Not glutting mush under that pole the lightning’s tied to. No farrow-shit in milk to make us randy. Us back in cool god-shit. We ate crisp. We nosed up good rank in the tunnelled bush. Us all fuckers then....
Erin Moure: the unmemntioable

Erin Moure: the unmemntioable

Erín Moure is a translator from French, Spanish, Galician, and Portuguese and the author of fourteen books of poetry. She has received the Governor General’s Award, the Pat Lowther Memorial Award, the A. M. Klein Prize, and has been a three-time finalist for the Griffin Poetry Prize. She lives in Montreal. The Unmemntioable is reprinted...
Dorothea Lasky: Three Poems

Dorothea Lasky: Three Poems

PEOPLE DO REALLY BAD THINGS People do really bad things But I don’t pay attention to most of them I knew that Alex was my real friend When he told me the one night That true love can not be calculated or contained Despite the orb of blue fire I always hold right up to...
Yekaterina Samutsevich: Closing Statement at the Pussy Riot Trial

Yekaterina Samutsevich: Closing Statement at the Pussy Riot Trial

by hecksinductionhour | August 8, 2012 · 7:40 pm Yekaterina Samutsevich: Closing Statement at the Pussy Riot Trial Yekaterina Samutsevich, defendant in the criminal case against the feminist punk group Pussy Riot: In the closing statement, the defendant is expected to repent, express regret for their deeds or enumerate attenuating circumstances. In my case, as...
Ben Hynes on Erica Baum's 'Dog Ear'

Ben Hynes on Erica Baum’s ‘Dog Ear’

Embedded in our current moment is the unique opportunity to interrogate the manner in which we conceive of what it means to read. A materiality that was once self-evident – i.e., you read a book, or a sign, or a magazine – in the relationship between a text and the act of reading has receded...
Betty White Says...

Betty White Says…

 

On Reviewing Natalie Walschots

LH: What do you think the purpose of a review is? If you also write about books on a blog, why? What does blogging let you do differently? NZW: The purpose of a review, be it a book review or an album review, is to communicate with that text’s potential audience, to place the text...

In which the Hound imitates a mic stand

For Michael Nardone. The next Synapse reading will have a real mic stand. Promise. Michael Nardone’s piece was incredible, by the way. I did my best not to respond as the lines were read, but they were great. Surprising. 

From the Office for Soft Architecture’s Department of Appliance Lore

Genius. More here. All good. What Does it Cost to Change the World? from WikiLeaks on Vimeo via Techpresident  –The Office for Soft Architecture, La Malgache, France

From the Office for Soft Architecture’s Department of Appliance Lore

Tasty bits from the London Review of Books. –The Office for Soft Architecture, La Malgache, France

Michael Nardone: On Colin Fulton

—- What are the phonemes within phenomena? What is their speak and how are they sounded? How does a phrase issue outward from event? What is the name of the pleasure that overcomes one when a string of words fastens itself to some unintended destination? How is it that a sentence takes hold? Colin Fulton’s...

Michael Nardone: Some Versions of Furniture Music

Kenneth Goldsmith, on Satie: In the midst of an art opening at a Paris gallery in 1902, Ambient music was born. Erik Satie and his cronies, after begging everyone in the gallery to ignore them, broke out into what they called Furniture Music–that is, background music–music as wallpaper, music to be purposely not listened to....

From the Office for Soft Architecture’s Department of Appliance Lore

The woman who helped spark the revolution.For more on Asmaa Mahfouz.

From the Office for Soft Architecture’s Department of Appliance Lore

Stupendous favourite film Nathalie Granger: and part 2: a key scene w the very young Depardieu, Jeanne Moreau, Lucia Bosé, shot in Duras’ country house.–Lisa Robertson, Vancouver

Pulled from my shelves #13: “A library is print in its gaseous state.”

Last week I confessed to having an oneiric bookstore compulsion. I am also (predictably) drawn to libraries. Small and large, a collection of books will no doubt attract my eye. Whenever I am at someone else’s house, I am drawn—like so many of my colleagues—to my host’s bookshelves and their evidence of reading. Authors, scholars...

Silver Car Sessions, Episode 2

A short interview with the unfailingly kind, ever-radical, always-magical poet-man Michael Nardone

A Conversation with Lisa Robertson

Michael Nardone: A lot of your work draws from an immediate environment, both landscape and peers. Thinking about where we are now—Open Space, an artist-run centre—and perhaps trying to locate our conversation in this place, can you speak about your involvement and collaborative work with your immediate community and involvement with artist- and writer-run centres...

Pulled off my shelves #9: “Have you studied the soft toes of geckoes?”

With each of these columns, I’ve attempted to interrogate an aspect of writing by exploring a series of books I’ve pulled from my bookshelves. The question has repeatedly been: what is a book? This week “What?” itself is a book. Over the last few years I’ve accumulated three different books (and am always happily looking...

Pulled off my Shelves #8: “All Work and No Play Makes Jack a Dull Boy”

In All Work and No Play Makes Jack a Dull Boy, Phil Buehler attempts to document, assemble and continue Jack Torrance’s manuscript from Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 film The Shining. Conceptually, recreating Torrance’s manuscript from the few frames of film shown playfully concretizes the fictional output of a fictional character. Only a few pages of the...

Pulled off my shelves #7: “Hence latent of satisfaction, relating singing of of bunch the effect.”

For the majority of my columns to date I have focused on the minimal, the smallest gestures—novels built of nothing but punctuation, novels built by erasing the majority of other people’s texts; novelists who create using nothing but blocks of colour, novelists who entirely refuse to write. But what about texts which weigh in on the...

A Conversation with Jeramy Dodds

from a public dialogue at Open Space, Victoria, 26 October 2010 NARDONE: Crabwise to the Hounds was a very particular book in that when it came out in the fall of 2008, it seemed to have an immediate impact. There was this unique voice throughout and a particular sense of poem-construction that felt at once...

Pulled off my shelves #6: “O, though I love what others do abhor”

Last week I discussed authors who craft their work entirely through erasure—erasing the majority of another writer’s oeuvre, leaving select words in place which form a new poetry. Those poets allowed a residual marker of the original poem in the placement of the remaining words—every word was located where the original author had places it;...

Pulled off my shelves #5: “Compose the Holes”

In my 3rd “pulled off my shelves” column I discussed authors who produce work which consists of nothing but punctuation marks. These authors—typified by Goldsmith, Reuterswärd, Boglione and others—isolate the punctuation marks from other authors and orchestrate a new novel which consists of potentialities. Allowing slightly more text that than these minimalist gestures are the...

Pulled off my shelves #4: “Besides, it’s always other people who die”

In my most recent “Pulled off my shelves” column I discussed poems and novels written without the use of any letters or words; those novels which consist entirely of punctuation. The writers eschew letters believing that they could be as convincing with only the skeleton of communication Are you a writer if you refuse words...

Pulled off my shelves #3: “There are some punctuations that are interesting and there are some punctuations that are not.”

In the various anthologies and publications of concrete and visual poetry I have piling up, its not particularly surprising to find visual poets who are intrigued by the graphic possibilities of punctuation. A few quick Canadian visual poetry examples include David Aylward’s Typescapes (Toronto: Coach House Press, 1967); Sha(u)nt Basmajian’s Boundaries Limits and Space (Toronto:...

Pulled off my Shelves #2: bill bissett’s Rush: what fuckan theory: a study uv language.

bill bissett’s work—for the past several decades—has been problematic. His lyrical voice is complicated by his complex idiosyncratic orthography. His concrete poetry intersperses dense typewriter-driven grid pieces with diagrams of ejaculating phalluses. Most problematic is the frequency of his books. Talonbooks has published a new bissett volume every 18 months for decades, and it has...

Pulled off my shelves #1: Alison Turnbull’s Spring Snow—A Translation (London: Book Works, 2002)

Thank you Sina for bringing me aboard lemonhound— I’m excited to be involved. This “pulled from my shelves” series will be my weekly exploration of concrete and conceptual books which I think have been overlooked or under-discussed; a chance to bring some texts out “from the vault”, dust them off and see where they lead…I...