LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Author Archive
Nicole Brossard: The Frame Work of Desire

Nicole Brossard: The Frame Work of Desire

Motivation Motivation is defined as “the action of (conscious and unconscious) forces that determine behavior.” We ought therefore to ask ourselves what is the source of our motivation, so as to identify the reasons and motives [les motifs et les mobiles] that generate and nourish feminist consciousness, and at the same time to understand how these two factors affect and...
The Newark Women’s Poetry Club: On Theory, A Sunday

The Newark Women’s Poetry Club: On Theory, A Sunday

For the life of her she can’t imagine how their lives are so different, yet they meet every Sunday in this town called Newark for the poetry club they decided to create. It’s funny how people’s lives have nothing in common, but then you find out you have one thing that ties the two of...
Gail Scott: Feminist at the Carnival

Gail Scott: Feminist at the Carnival

“The verse must be taken to the limit of expressiveness.” (Mayakovsky, How to Make Verses) It is then that the code opens to the rhyming body to formulate, against the present meaning, another meaning, for years to come, impossible. Julia Kristeva [1] Qu’est ce qui est incontournable (unskirtable!) dans le féminisme quand on écrit? What of one’s feminist consciousness...
Jamie Ross: On Theory, A Sunday

Jamie Ross: On Theory, A Sunday

1 The airlock on the huge lilac mead jug glugs away when it’s just me in the sunny third floor kitchen in Montréal’s North End. Way up from the water. The yarrow is flowering and the sumach berries are almost red enough for lemonade. July. I text him back, telling him to meet in the...
Louky Bersianik: Aristotle's Lantern

Louky Bersianik: Aristotle’s Lantern

The Fourth Estate Criticism inhabits the same space as the symbol: both are subject to interpretation, and are thus subjective. There is no more a science of the literary than there is a science of the symbol, even if various theories manage to tease out laws or detect constants. Critical reading, therefore, is nowhere near an exact science; in...
Louise Dupré: Four Sketches for a Morphology

Louise Dupré: Four Sketches for a Morphology

A-Morphs Madonna on television. “Like a Virgin,” she sings in her tiny, mechanical-doll voice. The teen idol of the moment, with exposed belly button and cross hanging from the ear. Bringing together the pornographic with the religious, simultaneously channeling two images that have demonstrated their staying power in Western imagination: the mother (Madonna, Mary, virgin mother of God)...
Erin Wunker: A reflection on reading La Théorie, un dimanche

Erin Wunker: A reflection on reading La Théorie, un dimanche

I first read La Théorie, un dimanche in Montréal twelve years ago. I was in graduate school. I had just moved back to Canada after living in the United States for a decade and a half. I was twenty-two. I did not think I needed feminism. I had never heard of Louise Cotnoir, of Gail...
Louise Cotnoir: Dreams for Human Brains

Louise Cotnoir: Dreams for Human Brains

The Subjecte of Interest [1] To want a woman-subject is to place oneself in a constant state of provocation and aggression: it is to speak of the future because the present literally kills. For those who manage to escape the massacre, the alternative within the patriarchal order is an absolute choice of either prison or exile. Banishment has “force of...
Krystal Languell: A Response to Theory, A Sunday

Krystal Languell: A Response to Theory, A Sunday

Editing and publishing poetry for a small press and a literary magazine has provided me with mentorship relationships and a kind of intimacy with texts I would not have been likely to encounter otherwise. I joined Belladonna* Collaborative in 2010 and one of the first projects I agreed to was working with Rachel Levitsky to see Theory, A Sunday through to...
Lisa Robertson: Theory, A City

Lisa Robertson: Theory, A City

Theory, A City: Introduction Lisa Robertson The feminist writers of Montréal have altered their city irrevocably. When women write about and from the cities they live in, they are transforming the material city into a web of possibility and risk. The description of the city bends back on itself — it not only represents, it opens up a site...

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