LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
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Vol. 8 Contents

Vol. 8 Contents

WELCOME to volume eight! It might look like we’ve been slacking off, but looks can be deceiving. We’ve simply decided to take things SLOW this time around. We want to enjoy each piece, savour it. That said, you can expect new content every Friday over the course of the next four weeks. Think of it...
Books of the year: A few of my favorite things

Books of the year: A few of my favorite things

Here are a few of my favorite things from the past year. The list doesn’t represent the best books–it can’t–I haven’t read all the books! It represents books that stuck with me. That I would buy and give and happily have on my shelves. I’m adding a note about gift appeal at the end of...
Memoirs & How We Review Women's Books

Memoirs & How We Review Women’s Books

Every Thing Rustles, Jane Silcott. Anvil, 2013. Drunk Mom, Jowita Bydlowska. Doubleday Canada, 2013. by Sina Queyras “But that Montreal scene, I say, cringing.” –Sarah Hampson I had always planned to read Drunk Mom, the memoir by Jowita Bydlowska. As a writer and a relatively new mother, it intrigued. Still, I wasn’t planning on reading it so soon–or so fast–like I...
VOLUME 5 IS LIVE

VOLUME 5 IS LIVE

Lemon Hound is going for Best in Show with the Volume 5. We are introducing a slate of new voices that have our tails pointing. We heard the readers, in our first two polls you asked for more of everything, rather than simply more reviews, or more poetry, and you asked for it more often....
Volume 3: Off Leash & Nipping

Volume 3: Off Leash & Nipping

LEMON HOUND more bite than bark since 2005 lemonhound.com   Press release For immediate distribution Montreal, 14 February 2013 volume  3  of  lemon  hound  is  now  available  online We’re off leash this Valentine’s with an array of nips on the back of the neck. We’ll be rolling posts out over the day and invite you...
Michael Robbins: To the Drone Vaguely Realizing Eastward

Michael Robbins: To the Drone Vaguely Realizing Eastward

TO THE DRONE VAGUELY REALIZING EASTWARD This is a poem for President Drone. It was written by a camel. Can I borrow your phone? This is for President Mark Hamill. Newtown sounds a red alert. Mark Hamill asks is Ernie burnt? Every camel’s a first-person shooter. The Prez’s fez is haute couture. It seems strange...
Percy Bysshe Shelley: A Defence of Poetry

Percy Bysshe Shelley: A Defence of Poetry

It doesn’t feel old, not at all, but it did feel male. Very male. Exclusively so. And so I’ve done a little intervention here. I’m not convinced it’s effective. Or even interesting…but I couldn’t resist myself either so I offer it here. It’s worth rereading in any case, right? If Twitter is any indication it...
Panning for Gold: The Fate of Short Fiction in a Novelistic World

Panning for Gold: The Fate of Short Fiction in a Novelistic World

I was recently sent a self-published collection of stories. The author of this collection had published previously, and been reviewed favourably. The new collection had been submitted to numerous publishers, I was told, but although the reaction to the quality of the writing was generally positive, no one was willing to publish the book, because...
The Men Around Here

The Men Around Here

The men around here huddle still and sudden as mountains. Their hands dangle like wrenches. Thumbs of sandpaper. Use me, they say. I’m ready. Hours gather, hard in stomachs. Overalls stiff,  scarred as the skin of elephants. There where the sparks landed, a hole, there where he dropped the blowtorch, a swath soft as the...
GANGNAM SEMIOTICS: IRONY AND THE POSTIRONIC MEME CULTURE

GANGNAM SEMIOTICS: IRONY AND THE POSTIRONIC MEME CULTURE

I don’t know about you but my day job looks a lot like this. And also this: Ah, the boundless entertainment of the internets. Link-swapping is up there with my preferred methods of workcrastination, and kinder to the wallet than online shopping (just try to forget your credit card numbers once they’re memorized, go ahead...
Gasping for air

Gasping for air

Although summer has a few more days left on the calendar, the beginning of September marks the beginning of the fall publishing season, with its surfeit of big books, author festivals, and glitzy award galas. It’s a season that has everyone – from publishers and award administrators to media outlets and book bloggers – clamouring...

On the Ethics of the Negative Review

Ah, Jan Zwicky. Someone I would like to hear more from, more often and in various venues. Anne Carson too for that matter–but she seems unwilling to comment on anything, not even her own career, which has been impressive and of course, subject to great suspicion on the part of fellow Canadian poets–didn’t one critic...

What a Little Pie Can Do For You…

Thanks to Gillian Jerome and the women who have signed on to CWILA for the sharp visuals that tell a story we all know to well: the number of women reviewing and being reviewed in the most mainstream and the most staunchly literary venues in Canada, like the US is shockingly low. Here’ a visual...
Mummified Barbies: Toward an Essay on Feminine Exteriority

Mummified Barbies: Toward an Essay on Feminine Exteriority

We cut their hair off. Chew on the breasts. Paint their bodies. Slip a condom over their heads and dip them in Spaghettios. We are never quite so inventive in imagining our own bodies as when we encounter this sterile, unreal version of femininity. Our first canvas. Our first manifestation. Our first bout of hostility...

The Lady Poets & All Their Lady Parts

Thanks to Don Share these are, respectively,  Edna St. Vincent Millay, Aline Kilmer, Sara Teasdale, Zoe Akins, Lola Ridge, Amy Lowell…for more see Poetry’s Tumblr. I get it. Getting called Critic Bitch, referred to as a smelly Margaret Wente, minimized, undermined (that’s the most popular form): Ladies, when the assholes start calling you names and...

A few more questions regarding women, reviewing and power structures

Here are the original four questions: 8mLemon Hound ‏ @lemonhound  Reply   Delete   Favorite  · Open Does the lack of women broadly accepted as intellectual/critical forces influence women’s creative relationships? #women&power #womenmentor 9mLemon Hound ‏ @lemonhound  Reply   Delete   Favorite  · Open Does the idea of success evoke a gendered constellation? #womenmentor #womenandpower 10mLemon Hound ‏ @lemonhound  Reply   Delete   Favorite  · Open Is that (successful) woman seen as a peer...

Because we all need a little pie

Closing The Gap: Reviewing Canadian Books Of Poetry Written By Women Posted on Friday, May 4th, 2012 at 9:00 am. Written by NatalieZed Every once in a while, I take a very careful look at the by-lines and review content of some of my favourite literary publications. Sometimes I do so because I think I might...

When poets turn to fiction : Sina Queyras : Harriet the Blog : The Poetry Foundation

Latest post over at Harriet. I find myself constantly wanting to apologize for not writing a big important boy novel about ideas, or a funny novel about a whimsical girl. Why is that? Everyone seems to have an idea about what a novel should and more emphatically, should not be. Novels, to my mind, are...

Aspect Ratio

Ongoing series of Montreal shots, particularly focusing on the northeast corner of the plateau.

Michael Nardone: Some Versions of Furniture Music

Kenneth Goldsmith, on Satie: In the midst of an art opening at a Paris gallery in 1902, Ambient music was born. Erik Satie and his cronies, after begging everyone in the gallery to ignore them, broke out into what they called Furniture Music–that is, background music–music as wallpaper, music to be purposely not listened to....

Proof that people confuse negative with intelligently, or amusingly, critical

Not that I need open the whole debate again (nuff said on that I think), but here’s a little piece by Michael Robbins that appeared in Poetry Magazine. Back when I was posting about reviews, Robbins and I were having a back and forth about what people were thinking of when they used the word “negative”...

The Lemon Hound Literary Rule

Okay, so riffing off of the Bechdel test discussed in my earlier post, here’s the Lemon Hound Lit Rule for assessing the cultural acuity of a given contemporary literary discussion, publication, essay, critical debate, or otherwise, purporting to be speaking generally of a literature or literatures, as opposed to something specialized, ie, men’s or masculinist...

Looking for, and Resisting, Diane Arbus

I posted on Diane Arbus very briefly after seeing her show at the Met, and after seeing a show in Chelsea. Briefly I suppose because despite her dual giantess status in both feminist and photography worlds, I’m still not sure what to say about her. The prolific photographer worked extensively in the 50s and 60s, publishing...

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