LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Essays & Fragments
Jane Malcolm: On Theory, A Sunday

Jane Malcolm: On Theory, A Sunday

Belladonna’s new translation of Theory, A Sunday comes to us just in time to respond to a resurgence of pop feminism—on This is What a Feminist Looks Like t-shirts, at the MTV VMAs, from the mouths of Beyoncé and Lena Dunham, on a “Feminist But Feminine!” sign at the end of a Chanel runway—and to...

Clara Lipfert: On Theory, A Sunday

I think of the ways that I move my body across New York City. I think of the itchiness in my veins that drives me out of the apartment for a walk, amongst light on stone and eyes on me. Find a bench to sit on, read in the sunlight, or watch other bodies move...

ON THE CAREER: Mentoring by Example

On the matter of career — Sina Queyras this post originally appeared on the Poetry Foundation website, March 16, 2010 at 12:15pm Poetry as career is always a contentious subject. My rather lighthearted attempts to open up the discussion this week make it seem as though I have a lighthearted approach, which couldn’t be farther...
Nicole Brossard: The Frame Work of Desire

Nicole Brossard: The Frame Work of Desire

Motivation Motivation is defined as “the action of (conscious and unconscious) forces that determine behavior.” We ought therefore to ask ourselves what is the source of our motivation, so as to identify the reasons and motives [les motifs et les mobiles] that generate and nourish feminist consciousness, and at the same time to understand how these two factors affect and...
The Newark Women’s Poetry Club: On Theory, A Sunday

The Newark Women’s Poetry Club: On Theory, A Sunday

For the life of her she can’t imagine how their lives are so different, yet they meet every Sunday in this town called Newark for the poetry club they decided to create. It’s funny how people’s lives have nothing in common, but then you find out you have one thing that ties the two of...
Gail Scott: Feminist at the Carnival

Gail Scott: Feminist at the Carnival

“The verse must be taken to the limit of expressiveness.” (Mayakovsky, How to Make Verses) It is then that the code opens to the rhyming body to formulate, against the present meaning, another meaning, for years to come, impossible. Julia Kristeva [1] Qu’est ce qui est incontournable (unskirtable!) dans le féminisme quand on écrit? What of one’s feminist consciousness...
Jamie Ross: On Theory, A Sunday

Jamie Ross: On Theory, A Sunday

1 The airlock on the huge lilac mead jug glugs away when it’s just me in the sunny third floor kitchen in Montréal’s North End. Way up from the water. The yarrow is flowering and the sumach berries are almost red enough for lemonade. July. I text him back, telling him to meet in the...
Louky Bersianik: Aristotle's Lantern

Louky Bersianik: Aristotle’s Lantern

The Fourth Estate Criticism inhabits the same space as the symbol: both are subject to interpretation, and are thus subjective. There is no more a science of the literary than there is a science of the symbol, even if various theories manage to tease out laws or detect constants. Critical reading, therefore, is nowhere near an exact science; in...
Stephen Collis: Report from the Climate March

Stephen Collis: Report from the Climate March

Poetry and the People’s Climate March: A Brief Report Stephen Collis How do we account for the lived quality of life itself, writ large—the vast web of species that are collectively, relationally, alive at any given moment we care to tune into our planetary presence? How do we think this biospheric being alive, and how...
Daphne Marlatt: On Theory, A Sunday

Daphne Marlatt: On Theory, A Sunday

Reading Theory, A Sunday, the recently released Belladonna English edition, of that 1988 Quebecoise feminist classic, La Theorie, un dimanche, was for me a curiously double experience.  Energizing, heartening, both pertinent and at the same time nostalgia-inducing for what seems a simpler time, now that we teeter on the brink of looming global climate crisis...
Louise Dupré: Four Sketches for a Morphology

Louise Dupré: Four Sketches for a Morphology

A-Morphs Madonna on television. “Like a Virgin,” she sings in her tiny, mechanical-doll voice. The teen idol of the moment, with exposed belly button and cross hanging from the ear. Bringing together the pornographic with the religious, simultaneously channeling two images that have demonstrated their staying power in Western imagination: the mother (Madonna, Mary, virgin mother of God)...
Erin Wunker: A reflection on reading La Théorie, un dimanche

Erin Wunker: A reflection on reading La Théorie, un dimanche

I first read La Théorie, un dimanche in Montréal twelve years ago. I was in graduate school. I had just moved back to Canada after living in the United States for a decade and a half. I was twenty-two. I did not think I needed feminism. I had never heard of Louise Cotnoir, of Gail...
Louise Cotnoir: Dreams for Human Brains

Louise Cotnoir: Dreams for Human Brains

The Subjecte of Interest [1] To want a woman-subject is to place oneself in a constant state of provocation and aggression: it is to speak of the future because the present literally kills. For those who manage to escape the massacre, the alternative within the patriarchal order is an absolute choice of either prison or exile. Banishment has “force of...
Krystal Languell: A Response to Theory, A Sunday

Krystal Languell: A Response to Theory, A Sunday

Editing and publishing poetry for a small press and a literary magazine has provided me with mentorship relationships and a kind of intimacy with texts I would not have been likely to encounter otherwise. I joined Belladonna* Collaborative in 2010 and one of the first projects I agreed to was working with Rachel Levitsky to see Theory, A Sunday through to...
Lisa Robertson: Theory, A City

Lisa Robertson: Theory, A City

Theory, A City: Introduction Lisa Robertson The feminist writers of Montréal have altered their city irrevocably. When women write about and from the cities they live in, they are transforming the material city into a web of possibility and risk. The description of the city bends back on itself — it not only represents, it opens up a site...
France Théoret: Elegy for the Memory of Women

France Théoret: Elegy for the Memory of Women

Each day I tell myself the story of my life. I know that this sentence is made up of heaviness, desire and truth, ambiguity in regard to writing. Feminism is a thing of yesterday, and so it is also a thing of today. Feminism speaks to the reality-ego.[1] Such a phrase fits only if I abandon it...
QVC 2

QVC 2

Earlier this winter Ben Fama invited several authors to contribute to the folio that follows, titled QVC. Participants were asked to write ~150 words about something they’d recently bought, bought into, invested themselves in, or otherwise consumed, a brief and thoughtful look into their relationship to an item or subject they wished to discuss. The inaugural...
Mira Mattar: Perhaps a finch, a finch perhaps

Mira Mattar: Perhaps a finch, a finch perhaps

Its head is ordinary. Its head is inquisitive. Its head is ordinary and inquisitive. Its head is ordinary but inquisitive. It is a head that is ordinary and inquisitive. It is a head that is ordinary but inquisitive. Can what is ordinary not also be inquisitive? Ordinariness does not preclude inquisitiveness. It is ordinary because...
Martha Baillie: The Search for Heinrich Schlögel - A Novel Sent in Fragments

Martha Baillie: The Search for Heinrich Schlögel – A Novel Sent in Fragments

Bitten by doubt, I pick at my prose. I stop writing. Though the novel is nearly done, a crucial element is missing. To prevent myself from destroying the manuscript, why not turn it into something other? Could it “coexist” in a second form? In the novel the year is 1974 and a teenaged German, named...
Erin Lyndal Martin: Notes Toward an Essay on the Construction of the Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família

Erin Lyndal Martin: Notes Toward an Essay on the Construction of the Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família

“The Sagrada Familia is the most hideous building in the world.”–George Orwell 2026. Projected date of completion. When is a church complete? This is not a literal question referring to resteeplings and maintenance that must be done over the years; this is a question of what a church is. But let us look at the...
Jonathan Ball: Misreading Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven"

Jonathan Ball: Misreading Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”

Whenever I teach “The Raven,” a number of students assume a particular misreading: that the narrator has murdered Lenore, and that the raven of the poem symbolizes his guilty conscience. I’m always shocked by how naturally this misreading comes. Students seem to realize it’s not sustainable as a “reasonable” interpretation, but prefer it to more...
Jacqueline Valencia: The Need for Lonely Women Film

Jacqueline Valencia: The Need for Lonely Women Film

‘The lonely man’ film is a term that I learned from writer/director Paul Schrader when he introduced Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver at the Royal Theatre in Toronto in 2013. Schrader penned the film during a deep and paranoid depressive state. As a woman, I identify with Travis Bickle’s awkwardness with social constructs, his isolation, and...
Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy on Indigenous Literatures: The Politics of the Invitation

Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy on Indigenous Literatures: The Politics of the Invitation

It may be argued that the field of literature, as an art, is marginalized in Canada in terms of disciplinary focus and financial support in comparison to say economics, politics, or science. The same may be said for literature as a cultural process, artifact, and product—the funding of literature and priority in funding literature is...

Raymond de Borja on Sincerity

My interest in thinking about sincerity is prompted by the sentence “I am writing the truth” and the possibilities that abound given I, am, writing, and truth. But also irony, the ease with which we have become ironic – how after our awareness of the spectacle our response has been mostly through some form of...
Geneviève Robichaud on Lucy Ives: Orange Roses

Geneviève Robichaud on Lucy Ives: Orange Roses

In Orange Roses (Ahsahta Press, 2013) there are surfaces and there are hidden stories, but the question seems to be: how can one excavate the surface and disclose something “natural” about the moment when language can only surmise an approximation of that moment? The epigraph by George Oppen corroborates this idea quite well: “approached the...