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Divya Victor: Color: A Sequence of Unbearable Happenings

Divya Victor: Color: A Sequence of Unbearable Happenings

Color: A Sequence of Unbearable Happenings “The story reveals the meaning of what otherwise would remain an unbearable sequence of sheer happenings” — Hannah Arendt, Men in Dark Times 1 It was a nice try. It was a nice move that made the black move to white. A nice move...
Lemon Hound Poetry Prize Shortlisted Poems

Lemon Hound Poetry Prize Shortlisted Poems

Our fabulous judge, Rae Armantrout, has selected the five finalists for our first poetry prize. The winner will receive $750. We’ll announce that winner Monday, April 7th. But, before then we will post all five finalists, one a day, because we think each of the finalists deserves to be read....
Joey Yearous-Algozin on Trisha Low: The Compleat Purge

Joey Yearous-Algozin on Trisha Low: The Compleat Purge

“After all: the ‘I’ is not to be expelled, but submitted to sacrifice.” —Nick Land, The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism In the current saturation of social media in which our daily confessions constitute only the generic projection of a self, The Compleat Purge (Kenning Editions, 2013)...
Elisa Gabbert on Mary Karr, Julia Cohen, and Tori Amos: Against Against Decoration

Elisa Gabbert on Mary Karr, Julia Cohen, and Tori Amos: Against Against Decoration

In an essay called “Against Decoration,” Mary Karr makes a case for using “decoration” in poetry – figurative language, sonic beauty – only in service of a greater purpose, what she takes to be the “primary purpose” of poetry: “to stir emotion.” “Delight in dense idiom or syntax,” she writes,...
Larry Tremblay: The Obese Christ

Larry Tremblay: The Obese Christ

THE THING The arrow was about to pierce the nape of my neck. Though I ran as fast as I could, raced down steep roads, leapt across ditches, climbed hills, it anticipated my every move, pursued me like a baying hound. I had no chance to escape. Resigned, I stopped...
Elvia Wilk in Conversation with J. R. Carpenter

Elvia Wilk in Conversation with J. R. Carpenter

Electronic Literature is a loaded and slippery category. It is rather dryly defined by the Electronic Literature Organization (what other art form needs a governing body?) as “works with important literary aspects that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the stand-alone or networked computer.” Does this mean...
Vol. 8 Contents

Vol. 8 Contents

WELCOME to volume eight! It might look like we’ve been slacking off, but looks can be deceiving. We’ve simply decided to take things SLOW this time around. We want to enjoy each piece, savour it. That said, you can expect new content every Friday over the course of the next...
Su Croll: Get it on. Bang a gong

Su Croll: Get it on. Bang a gong

Mira: ……..She didn’t know why but, out of the blue, Mira thought of Taylor. She remembered how he’d scared her. Her drinking had started to scare her too. She’d wake up and forget where she’d been or what she’d been up to, though maybe that was kind of the point...
Jordan Abel and Renée Saklikar in Conversation: Accumulation as a Political Act

Jordan Abel and Renée Saklikar in Conversation: Accumulation as a Political Act

Daniel Zomparelli (DZ): I read both of your books consecutively (The Place of Scraps (Talonbooks, 2013) by Jordan Abel and children of air india (Harbour Publishing, 2013) by Renée Saklikar), and in my opinion the books had similar themes. They both take a tragedy, differing in scale obviously, and the poet interjects into...
QVC 1

QVC 1

Earlier this winter I invited several authors to contribute to the folio that follows, titled QVC. Participants were asked to write ~150 words about something they’d recently bought, bought into, invested themselves in, or otherwise consumed, a brief and thoughtful look into their relationship to an item or subject they...
Jessica Langston on Joseph Boyden: The Orenda

Jessica Langston on Joseph Boyden: The Orenda

Joseph Boyden’s newest novel The Orenda (Penguin, 2013) was published to what seemed universal acclaim. Kamal Al-Soylaylee writing in Quill & Quire’s October issue described it as a “magnificent literary beast”; The Globe and Mail’s Charles Foran called it “a great, heartbreaking novel, full of fierce action and superb characters and...
Rae Spoon: Gender Failure

Rae Spoon: Gender Failure

In January of 2008, I heard about a new website that allowed people to post videos of themselves online for the world to see. I was feeling a bit cut off from my own world because at the time I was living in a small town in Germany. I decided...
Latest entries
Alex Porco in Conversation with David O'Meara

Alex Porco in Conversation with David O’Meara

Stitched Songs (7 Sept 2013 – 6 Nov 2013)   Alex Porco (AP): David, in your new book, A Pretty Sight (Coach House, 2013), the classical rhapsode is a central, recurring figure. The rhapsode is a figure of transport: he has the expressive power to move— or “possess”— his audience; at the same time, the rhapsode...
Elee Kraljii Gardiner: A Poem

Elee Kraljii Gardiner: A Poem

Elee Kraljii Gardiner directs Thursdays Writing Collective and is coeditor with John Asfour of V6A: Writing from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside(Arsenal Pulp Press, 2012), which was shortlisted for the 2012 City of Vancouver Book Award. She is also the editor of six books from the Collective, most recently The Stanza Project (Otter Press, 2013), an investigation of the intersection of architectural...

Max Bledstein on Omari Newton’s Sal Capone

Sal Capone: The Lamentable Tragedy of, a play by Omari Newton. MAI Centre, Montreal, 2013. By Max Bledstein The history of racial relations in North America has certainly been a topic of interest amongst filmmakers and playwrights in recent years, and one in which audiences have been happy to engage them. One need look no further...
Vol. 7 Contents

Vol. 7 Contents

Get cozy Lemon Hounders, this issue is brimming with FABULOUS content: including an interview with David O’Meara, poetry by Lisa Cattrone, an excerpt from Shelagh Plunkett’s memoir, as well as critical writing on Margaret Christakos, Marianne Boruch and Masha Tupitsyn. And so much MORE!!! Also stay tuned: we’ll be adding tones of HOT new content...
Eliot D'Silva on Geoffrey G. O'Brien's People on Sunday

Eliot D’Silva on Geoffrey G. O’Brien’s People on Sunday

People on Sunday, Geoffrey G. O’Brien. Wave Books, 2013. By Eliot D’Silva This is the problem staged in “Hesiod”, a poem towards the middle of Geoffrey G. O’Brien’s People on Sunday, the latest of his four collections. The book is written out of that negative space – also a span of time – across which...
Alan Reed on Michèle Bernstein & Everyone Agrees: La Nuit + After the Night

Alan Reed on Michèle Bernstein & Everyone Agrees: La Nuit + After the Night

All the King’s Horses, Michèle Bernstein. Trans. John Kelsey. Semiotext(e), 2008. The Night, Michèle Bernstein. Trans. Clodagh Kinsella, Ed. by Everyone Agrees. Book Works, 2013. After the Night, Everyone Agrees. Book Works, 2013. By Alan Reed   1. All the King’s Horses and The Night Michèle Bernstein is one of the founding members of the Situationist...
Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy in Conversation with Marilyn Dumont

Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy in Conversation with Marilyn Dumont

  Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy (WCS): Kinanaskomitinanan (thank-you) for considering these questions on your three poetry books, A Really Good Girl (1996), green girl dreams Mountains (2001), that tongued belonging (2007), and your latest manuscript, The Pemmican Eaters. Your poems map themselves out in terms of the landscapes and cityscapes that inform them. Can you share...

Jordan Davis: Three Poems

L’ AVVENTURA Softly, he insisted to himself, the peculiar conditions love requires enforce their perimeter. Some quinine slap-take, some shouts across backyards. At some point we find ourselves but that doesn’t mean we get caught, O Nadia Comaneci, who’s going to argue destiny with you… These are the twigs birds bring, playing “Global catastrophe,” a...

Anne Boyer: FORMULARY FOR NEW FEELING

“The Hacienda must be built.”— Ivan Chtcheglov[1] All furrowed foreheads are evidentiary. We can’t go three hours without encountering embodiments expressing obstacles in their backs. We move within repulsing and adhesive bodies whose sensations constantly draw us toward other bodies, also repulsing and adhesive. Certain entertainments, certain sensate hourly activities, allow us to brush against this information,...
Elisa Gabbert on Karen Green’s Bough Down

Elisa Gabbert on Karen Green’s Bough Down

Bough Down, Karen Green. Siglio, 2013. by Elisa Gabbert In comedy, a “callback” is a joke that makes reference to an earlier joke, to “build audience rapport.” In Bough Down, a hybrid collection you might call prose poetry, lyric essay, or memoir in verse, writer/artist Karen Green employs a constant calling back not for comic effect,...

m k s v o l c o f s k Y: Cæsura

It’s not in the river but in the ocean this time, where I wake up and find I’m too far out to get back.  It’s bright day and cloudless; the sky severe transparent blue, a gas flame with high yellow strangle.  I’m struck by the lack of panic in me; I tread water, turning like...
Chantale Potié Short Take on Beat Nation: Art, Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture

Chantale Potié Short Take on Beat Nation: Art, Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture

BEAT NATION: Art, Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture MACM, October 17 2013 – January 5 2014 By Chantale Potié I see the colour red and think of a beating heart, of red velvet cake, of ladybugs, of my road bike, my son’s bike, his Halloween fireman costume, of Swedish berries, and my favourite shirt which...

Concetta Principe: Four Poems

THESE THINGS the only witnesses to life are the things in it; the only listening occurs in the objects, gifts or found, which answer with being marked by living. for example, the photograph of a street from a front porch where the sofa is written with human oils and juices. the sofa received it all,...
Shelagh Plunkett: White girl

Shelagh Plunkett: White girl

  I was standing in bright sunlight waiting, once again, to shake a famous hand. Canada’s Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau was coming to Guyana, going to land that day, and I was there to shake his hand, or hoping to at least. That shake-hand time I wasn’t there to represent a nation or a race,...

Moez Surani: Real Life

  He would have consecrated more than a hundred tender and ironic pages to it, and would have embellished them with complex and scrupulous dialogue; he may well have added a touch of melodrama. The essence of the story… – J. L.BORGES, “THE DUEL” (I) “You look good,” he said, “with your glasses and your...

Benjamin Landry on Marianne Boruch’s The Book of Hours

The Book of Hours, Marianne Boruch. Copper Canyon, 2011 by Benjamin Landry The Book of Hours is a deeply metaphysical arrangement, the primary concern of which is the interrogation of the act of creation. In it, Boruch is god-stung and bitter, in the most productive ways, with alternating lyrical control and wildness, a lineage that...
Bronwyn Haslam on Margaret Christakos's Multitudes

Bronwyn Haslam on Margaret Christakos’s Multitudes

Multitudes, Margaret Christakos. Coach House Books, 2013. By Bronwyn Haslam  let’s push words into coming. gnash words into coming, into body. shove grammar onto parts. load coming into each. is it the threshold of coming or the deep thrash of asking? (Multitudes 13) *     *     * Like Christakos’s other work, Multitudes is sexy, excessive, slyly...
Nicholas Grider on Janice Lee's Damnation

Nicholas Grider on Janice Lee’s Damnation

Damnation, Janice Lee. Penny-Ante Editions, 2013 by Nicholas Grider In scientist Nicholas Humphrey’s recent book Seeing Red he describes two forms of “the present,” both of which Janice Lee’s Damnation explore in a kind of breathtaking inversion. According to Humphrey, there are two conscious presents: the first is an infinite number of infinitely small “physical”...

Alexander St Laurent on Blaise Morritz’s Zeppelin

Zeppelin, Blaise Morritz. Nightwood Editions, 2013. By Alexander St Laurent Blaise Morritz’s second collection, Zeppelin, is an intelligent and clever musing on the modern condition, or rather, the millennial condition. The poems explore the pitfalls of pop culture and materialism and how both of these elements might contribute to a sense of everlasting childhood. As...

Heather Cromarty on Masha Tupitsyn’s Love Dog

Love Dog, Masha Tupitsyn. Penny-Ante Editions, 2013. by Heather Cromarty In the past year I’ve read several female-penned books that began life online. Female personal writing takes place more and more in the open conversation of the Internet, and then if it’s “successful,” converted to a more elite print medium. Kate Zambreno’s Heroines was a...

Shane Neilson on Heighton & Sanger: Stalin’s Canival + Fireship: Early Poems 1964-1991

Stalin’s Carnival, Steven Heighton. Palimpsest Press, 2013. Fireship: Early Poems 1964 – 1991. Peter Sanger. Gaspereau Press, 2013. by  Shane Neilson The re-issue of a debut book of poetry is an uncommon event. Economics and the relative low interest in republished poetry are a factor, but perhaps the biggest factor is the relative weakness of debuts...

Lisa Cattrone: Five Poems

STUDY OF A Rocket or proposition if there is nothing left to think about and a million poppies and a reddish sun and a million white moths at night. If a type of hair came down from said “sun” and moved a Mars-like dust around the moths. If yellow statues with pipes and lights in...
Emily Keeler: Anne Carson at IFOA

Emily Keeler: Anne Carson at IFOA

Anne Carson Wednesday, October 30, 2013 The line is so long and the lobby is so small and we’re all here to see a poet who is improbably famous but very deservedly beloved. As soon as I take my seat in the dark theatre, I notice a who’s who trickling in, authors and publishers and...
David O'Meara: Vicious

David O’Meara: Vicious

VICIOUS (or, On Dissent) CHARACTERS Socrates Sid Vicious SOC. Wait, stranger! Why the rush? This place just turns upon itself, so to leave is only a step to hurrying back. What’s the difference if you pause and talk? Those scars across your chest and face: did you once march with spear and shield? I fought...
Poetry Contest: Rae Armantrout, Judge

Poetry Contest: Rae Armantrout, Judge

Gary Barwin: The Hand

Gary Barwin: The Hand

In Conversation: Catherine Leclerc & Robert Majzels

Catherine Leclerc (CL): For Sure is the fifth novel by France Daigle that you translated. For our readers, 1953: Chronicle of a Birth Foretold (1997) was the first, then you went on with Just Fine (1999), A Fine Passage (2002), Life’s Little Difficulties (2004), and now For Sure.  This almost seems like a cycle, especially since Daigle’s latest novel explicitly refers to 1953 and comments on it, as can...

Chris Gilmore on Alice Munro’s Prue

“Prue.” The Moons of Jupiter,  Alice Munro. Penguin, 2006. Essay By Chris Gilmore Prue: “Somebody Who Doesn’t Take Herself Too Seriously”  In “Prue,” the title character is described as “somebody who doesn’t take herself too seriously” (Munro 130). In moderation, humility is an admirable trait; however, Prue’s humility is so pervasive that it becomes a generalized sense of...

Aimee Wall on Vickie Gendreau’s Testament

Testament, Vickie Gendreau. Le Quartanier, 2012. Essay by Aimee Wall JEAN SHORT PARTY.DOC We are enfants terribles. We are fils absents. We are du même nom de famille plate. We are histoire plate. We are même pas dignes de mention. We are quand même dans ta playlist. We are pas loin de plein d’autres noms...
Lemon Hound Turns One: A Prose & Narrative Folio

Lemon Hound Turns One: A Prose & Narrative Folio

Bark, Bark! Lemon Hound turns one! For our one-year anniversary we offer you a special Prose & Narrative folio. We do so to affirm our commitment to engaging in a wide swath of contemporary literature and signal our intention to publish the best, most exciting new voices. Our first ever folio includes excerpts from several...

Krystal Languell: Five Poems

Sense   The plots are: loss, gain, or new friend. All man vs. himself. I am in search of who will watch me do my tricks. What do you do when you’re not getting stressed out. Tell me to let the knife do the work. Begin an idea. So punk I can’t spell descendants right...
Toby Altman: Paragraphs on Lyric Poetry

Toby Altman: Paragraphs on Lyric Poetry

I will refer to the kind of writing in which I am involved as lyric poetry. In lyric poetry the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work. When an author uses a lyric form of writing, it means that all of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution...

Stephen Collis: Towards a Dialectical Poetry

Towards a Dialectical Poetry[1] 1. The Problem of Names In trying to make some distinctions within radical poetries, I want to begin with the problem of names—what we mean when we call poetry “innovative,” “avant-garde,” or “experimental.” INNOVATIVE. Perhaps currently the most common word to designate the poetry lying outside the supposed “mainstream,” “innovative” as...
On Reading & Reviewing: Anita Lahey

On Reading & Reviewing: Anita Lahey

When I was editing poetry reviews for Arc Poetry Magazine, I had my radar tuned for pieces that were mean-spirited, careless or just plain blind. These sins, however, were rare, and when caught (usually) easily addressed. What troubled me more was reticence, reserve—any smokescreen cloaking the reviewer’s true feelings. I believe a review should offer...
Jaime Lee Kirtz on Juliana Spahr

Jaime Lee Kirtz on Juliana Spahr

Gentle Now, Don’t Add to Heartache I. We come into the world. We come into the world and there it is. The sun is there. The brown of the river leading to the blue and the brown of the ocean is there. Salmon and eels are there moving between the brown and the brown and...
Misreadings: Jonathan Ball on Yann Martel

Misreadings: Jonathan Ball on Yann Martel

Life of Pi, Yann Martel. Vintage Canada, 2002.  by Jonathan Ball Misreadings imagines alternative (or détourned) versions of literary and film works, and subjects these nonexistent imaginings to analysis. Let’s imagine that Yann Martel’s much-admired and much-maligned novel Life of Pi is, in secret fact, a horror novel. The most obvious horror-story aspect of Martel’s novel...
Tanis MacDonald on Shawna Lemay's Hive: A Forgery

Tanis MacDonald on Shawna Lemay’s Hive: A Forgery

Hive: A Forgery,  Shawna Lemay. Self-published, 2012. Reviewed by Tanis MacDonald To say that Shawna Lemay’s poetic prose in Hive: A Forgery reminded me of Elizabeth Smart’s By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept may be to invite a weighty – or overblown – comparison of Smart’s classic to Lemay’s more recent text....

Paul Watkins on Vicuña and bissett: A Poetics of “Meditaysyun”

Spit Temple, Cecilia Vicuña. Trans. Rosa Alcalá. Ugly Duckling Press, 2012. hungree throat, bill bissett. Talonbooks, 2013. Review By Paul Watkins  As literary scholar Charles Bernstein states: “What interests me is a poetry and a poetics that do not edit out so much as edit in: that include multiple conflicting perspectives and types of languages...

Eric Schmaltz on The Dark Would: an anthology of language art

The Dark Would: anthology of language art. Ed. Philip Davenport. Apple Pie Editions, 2013. Review by Eric Schmaltz For years now many practitioners who have identified with uncreative writing and the Conceptual writing movement have appealed to Brion Gysin’s assertion that “poetry is fifty years behind painting.” The claim has prompted an array of contemporary...
In Conversation: Meredith Evans & Danielle Bobker

In Conversation: Meredith Evans & Danielle Bobker

Why we love Paolo Sorrentino’s This Must Be the Place M. “Why we love This Must Be the Place” is a pretty good title for our discussion of Paolo Sorrentino’s 2011 film. I’m glad you floated it. Trying to articulate why we love a particular book or poem or movie is often what we, as...

Fazeela Jiwa on Maged Zaher’s Thank You for the Window Office

Thank You for the Window Office, Maged Zaher. Ugly Duckling Presse, 2012. Review by Fazeela Jiwa In Thank You for the Window Office, Maged Zaher’s writing echoes the short attentions and overstimulation of the Internet age. He offers an array of striking images and short phrases of the kind that might populate “Homer’s Twitter feed,”...
Geneviève Robichaud: Self-Translation in Two Movements

Geneviève Robichaud: Self-Translation in Two Movements

Click on the image below to view the slideshow. [Self-Translation in Two Movements Excerpt] I am not a theoretician of the bilingual text. Not yet anyway. I have merely, like other writers who find themselves in the bind of a “dual linguistic identity,” sought, on one hand, to channel the otherness of the self in...
In Conversation: Buckley, Kerouac, Yablonsky & Sanders

In Conversation: Buckley, Kerouac, Yablonsky & Sanders

Firing Line with William F. Buckley, 1968 Guests: Jack Kerouac, Lewis Yablonsky, and Ed Sanders transcribed by Jason Grimmer A 1968 episode of William F. Buckley’s Firing Line, featuring a drunken Jack Kerouac, the Fug’s Ed Sanders and a clueless academic, Lewis Yablonsky, discussing the “Hippie” movement. BUCKLEY: The topic tonight is the hippies. An...
Nicholas Papaxanthos on Mary Ruefle: Writing is Writing

Nicholas Papaxanthos on Mary Ruefle: Writing is Writing

Madness, Rack, and Honey, Mary Ruefle. Wave Books, 2012. Trances of the Blast, Mary Ruefle. Wave Books, 2013. Review by Nicholas Papaxanthos “I always looked askance at writing on writing, but I’m intelligent enough to see that writing is writing.” — Mary Ruefle, from her introduction to Madness, Rack, and Honey Madness, Rack, and Honey...
Indigenous Literature: Book Interview by Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy

Indigenous Literature: Book Interview by Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy

Ceremonies for the Dead, Giles Benaway. Kegedeonce Press, 2013 I want to share my thanks and appreciation Giles, for allowing your first published collection of poems to be a dwelling place for the Dead. How did the Dead manage to get such space and why is this space ceremonial? The title “Ceremonies for the Dead” is...

Myna Wallin on Ann Shin’s The Family China

The Family China, Ann Shin. Brick Books, 2013. Reviewed by Myna Wallin On the cover of Ann Shin’s second collection of poetry, The Family China, a photograph shows the female head of a porcelain figurine being decapitated by the large swing of a hammer in mid-blow. This cleverly arresting image foreshadows what’s to come: fragility...
In Conversation: Leesa Dean & Catherine Bush

In Conversation: Leesa Dean & Catherine Bush

Accusation, Catherine Bush. Goose Lane, 2013. The first time I heard Catherine Bush read from her forthcoming novel, Accusation, was three years ago. We were staying at a monastery near Lumsden, SK, as part of the Sage Hill Writing Experience. At night, the writers and workshop participants took turns reading on a makeshift stage in a space that...

Zoe Sharpe on Kelli Deeth’s The Other Side of Youth

The Other Side of Youth, Kelli Deeth. Arsenal Pulp Press, 2013. Review by Zoe Sharpe Kelli Deeth’s The Other Side of Youth is a collection of acute and subtle short stories whose characters have reached various emotional thresholds. Here we have stories of longing, loss, and fragmented identity, recurrently within a gendered (female) experience. The...

Nikki Sheppy on Gillian Savigny’s Notebook M

Notebook M, Gillian Savigny. Insomniac Press, 2012. Review by Nikki Sheppy Winner of the 2013 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award, Gillian Savigny’s Notebook M explores the poetic dimensions of the scientific imaginary. Drawing on both the empirical and the invented, the poems consider nature a form of intelligent art and science an impassioned creative inquiry, as...
Alan Reed on George Perec's La Boutique Obscure

Alan Reed on George Perec’s La Boutique Obscure

La Boutique Obscure, Georges Perec. Trans. Daniel Levin Becker. Melville House, 2013 Review by Alan Reed La Boutique Obscure is a translation of the dream journal kept by Georges Perec between May 1968 and August 1972. Perec was one of the more prolific members of Oulipo (Ouvroir de littérature potentielle—roughly, the workshop of potential literature),...

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