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Geneviève Robichaud in Conversation with Chus Pato (Translated by Erín Moure)

Geneviève Robichaud in Conversation with Chus Pato (Translated by Erín Moure)

On the occasion of the recently released Secession by Chus Pato with Insecession by Erín Moure (BookThug, 2014), I had the lucky opportunity of discussing this work with both authors. Seeing how in Secession/Insecession the two texts face each other, are in correspondence with each other, this interview befittingly begins...
Fazeela Jiwa in Conversation with Rita Wong and Larissa Lai: sybil unrest

Fazeela Jiwa in Conversation with Rita Wong and Larissa Lai: sybil unrest

[June 9, 2014] Fazeela Jiwa (FJ): sybil unrest was originally published by LINEBooks in 2008, and was just re-released by New Star Books late last year. In your acknowledgements you state that the poem began during the “fraught moment” of the 2003 SARS crisis and the American invasion of Iraq. Is...
Mira Mattar: Perhaps a finch, a finch perhaps

Mira Mattar: Perhaps a finch, a finch perhaps

Its head is ordinary. Its head is inquisitive. Its head is ordinary and inquisitive. Its head is ordinary but inquisitive. It is a head that is ordinary and inquisitive. It is a head that is ordinary but inquisitive. Can what is ordinary not also be inquisitive? Ordinariness does not preclude...
Alex Porco in Conversation with Kerri Pullo

Alex Porco in Conversation with Kerri Pullo

Kerri Pullo’s asemic writing exists at the boundaries of calligraphy, visual poetry, and graffiti. Her rhythmic markings, colors, and textures attempt to reproduce the mind’s energia— its transitions, leaps, interruptions, digressions, and even dissipation. Examples of her work are interspersed throughout the interview that follows below. With good humor and...
Martha Baillie: The Search for Heinrich Schlögel - A Novel Sent in Fragments

Martha Baillie: The Search for Heinrich Schlögel – A Novel Sent in Fragments

Bitten by doubt, I pick at my prose. I stop writing. Though the novel is nearly done, a crucial element is missing. To prevent myself from destroying the manuscript, why not turn it into something other? Could it “coexist” in a second form? In the novel the year is 1974...
Marianne Ackerman on Donna Tartt: The Goldfinch

Marianne Ackerman on Donna Tartt: The Goldfinch

Twenty pages into The Goldfinch (Little Brown and Company, 2013) I started having chest pains, accompanied by shortness of breath. My wrist tingled. I figured it must be something I ate, or maybe early signs of a heart attack. But the most obvious source of discomfort lay close at hand,...
La Théorie, un dimanche: we want to hear from you

La Théorie, un dimanche: we want to hear from you

In celebration of Quebec’s diverse writing by women, we’re putting a celebratory folio together for the fall that captures the impact that La Théorie, un dimanche (remue-ménage, 1988) and its recent translation Theory, A Sunday (Belladonna*, 2013) has had since its initial publication in the eighties. We invite you to...
Jacqueline Valencia: The Need for Lonely Women Film

Jacqueline Valencia: The Need for Lonely Women Film

‘The lonely man’ film is a term that I learned from writer/director Paul Schrader when he introduced Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver at the Royal Theatre in Toronto in 2013. Schrader penned the film during a deep and paranoid depressive state. As a woman, I identify with Travis Bickle’s awkwardness with...
Vol. 9 Contents

Vol. 9 Contents

DEAREST READER, With the dog days just beyond the horizon, we are getting sirius and heating up our own brand of caniculārēs: introducing a new slate of content so bright you’re gonna want to wear shades! Volume 9 features poetry by Laura Broadbent and Rachael Katz to name only a couple;...
Douglas Kearney: Two Poems

Douglas Kearney: Two Poems

“I HAVE A PENIS! MAMA HAS A PENIS!” a song in me of my daughter’s wayward penis, twin to her brother’s stolid one. gone on its hero’s wanderings, audacious penis! it’s nautical, my daughter’s penis, a craft of sail, propeller, or oar, madcap ship of the frothy bath sea penis!...
John Cotter: Comment & Selection of Bill Knott Poems

John Cotter: Comment & Selection of Bill Knott Poems

Bill Knott wrote matchless and indelible poems in a wider variety of styles and modes than most mature poets try on while shopping. Remarkably, though he was loathe to acknowledge it, single voice can be heard ringing through each: righteous and irascible as a prophet, wised-up but awake to new...
Vanessa Place: As James Franco knows

Vanessa Place: As James Franco knows

AS JAMES FRANCO KNOWS As James Franco knows, Poetry makes me feel like I can create whatever I want, because all you really have to do is express what you feel emotionally and physically and how this affects the world around you As James Franco knows, Poetry makes me feel...
Divya Victor: Color: A Sequence of Unbearable Happenings

Divya Victor: Color: A Sequence of Unbearable Happenings

Color: A Sequence of Unbearable Happenings “The story reveals the meaning of what otherwise would remain an unbearable sequence of sheer happenings” — Hannah Arendt, Men in Dark Times 1 It was a nice try. It was a nice move that made the black move to white. A nice move...
Lemon Hound Poetry Prize Shortlisted Poems

Lemon Hound Poetry Prize Shortlisted Poems

Our fabulous judge, Rae Armantrout, has selected the five finalists for our first poetry prize. The winner will receive $750. We’ll announce that winner Monday, April 7th. But, before then we will post all five finalists, one a day, because we think each of the finalists deserves to be read....
Latest entries

Alice Burdick: Terms and Conditions

TERMS AND CONDITIONS Remember your terms. They are final. It’s good to have a hook or teeth to hold onto the ideas. Reel em back with that kite movement, brain floating on its column. Spine shake, snake bones through the day. I will hold the endless count of rooms in the real estate of desire....
Christine Walde: Two Poems

Christine Walde: Two Poems

BLACK ELECTRICITY Is this where it started for you From here the sudden shocks Hooks pulled back to reveal The onyx-furred tunnel Her voice calling out your nature Silent among the pines & that spiked head of some heaven Starry that cradled you Over the water & made you want Her body lightning You divined...
Eric Schmaltz on John Riddell: The Selected Fiction of John Riddell

Eric Schmaltz on John Riddell: The Selected Fiction of John Riddell

Writing Surfaces: The Selected Fiction of John Riddell (Wilfred Laurier UP, 2013) is an overdue and timely re-introduction of one of Canada’s most radical, enigmatic media experimenters and fictioneers. Riddell’s concretistic, playful, unreadable, procedural, and non-representational works are numerous and have been too often overlooked. Beginning his career in the early 1960s, his work appeared in...
Bukem Reitmayer on Vivek Shraya: God Loves Hair

Bukem Reitmayer on Vivek Shraya: God Loves Hair

They say Your skin is blue because You are infinite like the sky and the ocean of milk You rest on. I wish my skin was blue. So begins the piece entitled “Dear Vishnu” in Vivek Shraya’s playful and intimate collection of prose poem-like stories, God Loves Hair (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2014). Among brief flashes...
Joey Yearous-Algozin on Trisha Low: The Compleat Purge

Joey Yearous-Algozin on Trisha Low: The Compleat Purge

“After all: the ‘I’ is not to be expelled, but submitted to sacrifice.” —Nick Land, The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism In the current saturation of social media in which our daily confessions constitute only the generic projection of a self, The Compleat Purge (Kenning Editions, 2013) may mark the death of...
Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy on Indigenous Literatures: The Politics of the Invitation

Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy on Indigenous Literatures: The Politics of the Invitation

It may be argued that the field of literature, as an art, is marginalized in Canada in terms of disciplinary focus and financial support in comparison to say economics, politics, or science. The same may be said for literature as a cultural process, artifact, and product—the funding of literature and priority in funding literature is...
Longlist for Lemon Hound's first Poetry Prize

Longlist for Lemon Hound’s first Poetry Prize

After more deliberation than we thought humanly possible we have a long list and will shortly announce the short list for the first Lemon Hound Prize for Poetry judged by the amazing Rae Armantrout. I am publishing this list with a good deal of excitement at the range and general fantasticness of the poems and...

Raymond de Borja on Sincerity

My interest in thinking about sincerity is prompted by the sentence “I am writing the truth” and the possibilities that abound given I, am, writing, and truth. But also irony, the ease with which we have become ironic – how after our awareness of the spectacle our response has been mostly through some form of...
Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy in Conversation with Vera Wabegijig

Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy in Conversation with Vera Wabegijig

This conversation is based on an email exchange occurring between January 6 – 20, 2014. A glossary of anishinaabemowin (anishinaabe language, whose orthography does not employ capitals) is included at the end of the interview. A longer version of this interview can be found here.   Waaseyaa’sin Christine Sy (WCS): Language, our language is everywhere. I...
Geneviève Robichaud on Lucy Ives: Orange Roses

Geneviève Robichaud on Lucy Ives: Orange Roses

In Orange Roses (Ahsahta Press, 2013) there are surfaces and there are hidden stories, but the question seems to be: how can one excavate the surface and disclose something “natural” about the moment when language can only surmise an approximation of that moment? The epigraph by George Oppen corroborates this idea quite well: “approached the...
Elisa Gabbert on Mary Karr, Julia Cohen, and Tori Amos: Against Against Decoration

Elisa Gabbert on Mary Karr, Julia Cohen, and Tori Amos: Against Against Decoration

In an essay called “Against Decoration,” Mary Karr makes a case for using “decoration” in poetry – figurative language, sonic beauty – only in service of a greater purpose, what she takes to be the “primary purpose” of poetry: “to stir emotion.” “Delight in dense idiom or syntax,” she writes, is a secondary purpose (50)....
Zachariah Wells: Nailing Down the Hard Parts

Zachariah Wells: Nailing Down the Hard Parts

Pino Coluccio First Comes Love Suzanne Buffam Past Imperfect CANADIAN POETRY LOVES A GOOD debutante ball. Since the 1930s, we have heralded the arrival of new generations of poets in anthologies which are the textual equivalent of coming out parties: momentous to the participants and their families, but of very little long-term interest to serious...
Larry Tremblay: The Obese Christ

Larry Tremblay: The Obese Christ

THE THING The arrow was about to pierce the nape of my neck. Though I ran as fast as I could, raced down steep roads, leapt across ditches, climbed hills, it anticipated my every move, pursued me like a baying hound. I had no chance to escape. Resigned, I stopped running, and stiff and straight...
Adam Sol on David B. Goldstein: Laws of Rest

Adam Sol on David B. Goldstein: Laws of Rest

LAWS OF REST Examine your clothing before going out, for you may be carrying something without knowing it. Do not place a wick into a bowl of oil, for then the oil will be drawn up and you will promote burning. Do not light with cedar bast or uncombed flax. Are you Nahum the Mede? So...
Michael Casteels: Two Poems and One Frog-Pond Sudoku

Michael Casteels: Two Poems and One Frog-Pond Sudoku

SONNET The irises arrive, serene and swallowing the orchard, the sultan seated beneath harvest. Pupils dilate and ripen in this hinterland, this salubrious work-in-progress. A pheasant integrates from treetop to treetop; the curtains part and there she is, oh trembling heart, oh hyperventilation! If I were a horse I’d equilibrate, if a rhinoceros, I’d radiate...
Max Karpinski on Jessica Bozek: The Tales

Max Karpinski on Jessica Bozek: The Tales

There is a reticence in the sentences of Jessica Bozek’s The Tales (Les Figues Press, 2013). This is a slow and heavy read, a difficult text that requires sitting and soaking. Bozek treads carefully, weaving a convoluted story out of sometimes contradictory and confusing prose poems. But The Tales is less about a narrative, less...
Elvia Wilk in Conversation with J. R. Carpenter

Elvia Wilk in Conversation with J. R. Carpenter

Electronic Literature is a loaded and slippery category. It is rather dryly defined by the Electronic Literature Organization (what other art form needs a governing body?) as “works with important literary aspects that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the stand-alone or networked computer.” Does this mean everything or nothing? If there’s...
Kate Sterns on Claire Messud: The Woman Upstairs

Kate Sterns on Claire Messud: The Woman Upstairs

Nora Eldridge, the narrator of Claire Messud’s latest novel, The Woman Upstairs (Random House, 2013), is by her own description one of those quiet women—middle-aged, single, dutiful—who live “at the end of the third floor hallway, whose trash is always tidy, [and] who smiles brightly in the stairwell with a cheerful greeting.” (Cats are optional.)...
Vol. 8 Contents

Vol. 8 Contents

WELCOME to volume eight! It might look like we’ve been slacking off, but looks can be deceiving. We’ve simply decided to take things SLOW this time around. We want to enjoy each piece, savour it. That said, you can expect new content every Friday over the course of the next four weeks. Think of it...
Jaime Forsythe: Two Poems

Jaime Forsythe: Two Poems

INSTRUCTIONS FOR HEAVY WEATHER after a collaboration with Alice Burdick You egg cup, you balloon animal, shatter and burst, dilute without fuss. Two celestial bodies nod hello while a bucket of paint overflows in the rain. Beach your testimony for a tried-and-true myth. Fiddlehead your hair for the ceremony? Not enough. In the wet glow,...
Su Croll: Get it on. Bang a gong

Su Croll: Get it on. Bang a gong

Mira: ……..She didn’t know why but, out of the blue, Mira thought of Taylor. She remembered how he’d scared her. Her drinking had started to scare her too. She’d wake up and forget where she’d been or what she’d been up to, though maybe that was kind of the point in those long years after...
Jordan Abel and Renée Saklikar in Conversation: Accumulation as a Political Act

Jordan Abel and Renée Saklikar in Conversation: Accumulation as a Political Act

Daniel Zomparelli (DZ): I read both of your books consecutively (The Place of Scraps (Talonbooks, 2013) by Jordan Abel and children of air india (Harbour Publishing, 2013) by Renée Saklikar), and in my opinion the books had similar themes. They both take a tragedy, differing in scale obviously, and the poet interjects into these tragedies to create a...
Trisha Low on Nathaniel G. Moore: Savage 1986-2011

Trisha Low on Nathaniel G. Moore: Savage 1986-2011

“The function of the wrestler is not to win: it is to go exactly through the motions which are expected of him.” —Roland Barthes, “The World of Wrestling,” Mythologies Let’s start with the weekend, because I have to start somewhere. So, okay, I’m writing this review at home, it’s a weekend, one that I’m jokingly...
Christine Miscione on John Berryman: The Dream Songs

Christine Miscione on John Berryman: The Dream Songs

DREAM SONG 4 Filling her compact & delicious body with chicken páprika, she glanced at me twice. Fainting with interest, I hungered back and only the fact of her husband & four other people kept me from springing on her or falling at her little feet and crying ‘You are the hottest one for years...
Eric Schmaltz on Stephen Collis: The Red Album

Eric Schmaltz on Stephen Collis: The Red Album

Let’s pretend: you review me, I review you. We read each other’s poems (barely) and whisper sweet nothings, banal praise. We attend ‘events’ to ‘see’ others and ‘be seen.’ This is all the theatre of criticism. Who did you pretend to be today? What writer did you pretend to read? What was your pretend honest...
Peter Gizzi: In Defense of Nothing: Selected Poems, 1987–2011

Peter Gizzi: In Defense of Nothing: Selected Poems, 1987–2011

– from the book: So the bird’s in the hand and now what? The penny shiny in the dark belly of mr. piggy. The day dawns and dawns and may be in trouble of actually going anywhere. Trees migrate secretly up- ward. They might be saying all we need to be here if we would...
George Murray: Three Poems

George Murray: Three Poems

PROPER PUNCTUATION Forecasts are for chumps, he told her, tapping the paper. Write that down in your notebook there. All angle and spangle, the weather punks its tattooed forehead into your face. A Scottish Kiss. This is what it means to be raw. No manufactured amp feedback or rusty strings or rebel lowercase. Now is...
Jason Freure: Two Short Takes on Eckerlin & Laporte

Jason Freure: Two Short Takes on Eckerlin & Laporte

In Jesse Eckerlin’s We Are Not the Bereaved (Frog Hollow Press, 2012), the land is a board game with no one left around who knows how to play it, except for the backwater hicks and storied eccentrics who cling like moss from another century to modern PEI. Eckerlin imagines the countryside as a space of...
QVC 1

QVC 1

Earlier this winter I invited several authors to contribute to the folio that follows, titled QVC. Participants were asked to write ~150 words about something they’d recently bought, bought into, invested themselves in, or otherwise consumed, a brief and thoughtful look into their relationship to an item or subject they wish to discuss. QVC, as...
Jessica Langston on Joseph Boyden: The Orenda

Jessica Langston on Joseph Boyden: The Orenda

Joseph Boyden’s newest novel The Orenda (Penguin, 2013) was published to what seemed universal acclaim. Kamal Al-Soylaylee writing in Quill & Quire’s October issue described it as a “magnificent literary beast”; The Globe and Mail’s Charles Foran called it “a great, heartbreaking novel, full of fierce action and superb characters and an unblinking humanity”; even the...
Prathna Lor on Ron Silliman: Revelator

Prathna Lor on Ron Silliman: Revelator

Opening with “Words torn, unseen, unseemly, scene,” one is immediately told how to read, what to do with Ron Silliman’s Revelator (BookThug, 2013).[1] Comprehension is not mandatory; cohesion is still abundant. Indeed, reading as a chaotic line of thought that shutters out, dissipates into harmonious cacophonies of scenes, sounds, voices, and visions, each line of...
Rae Spoon: Gender Failure

Rae Spoon: Gender Failure

In January of 2008, I heard about a new website that allowed people to post videos of themselves online for the world to see. I was feeling a bit cut off from my own world because at the time I was living in a small town in Germany. I decided to record a video of...
J'Lyn Chapman on Wallace Stevens

J’Lyn Chapman on Wallace Stevens

WAVING ADIEU, ADIEU, ADIEU That would be waving and that would be crying, Crying and shouting and meaning farewell, Farewell in the eyes and farewell at the centre, Just to stand still without moving a hand. In a world without heaven to follow, the stops Would be endings, more poignant than partings, profounder, And that...
Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer: All the Broken Things

Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer: All the Broken Things

The truck lurched into a field, the trucks and trailers lined up in a makeshift parking lot. Gerry swung the truck around so the back end faced a cage set up there. Choking dust rose up around them as they got out. Bo pulled his rucksack onto his back, felt the soft thump of the...
Emily Dickinson & Jen Bervin: Gorgeous Somethings

Emily Dickinson & Jen Bervin: Gorgeous Somethings

Far, far outside of MFA circles there is a poet whose poetic practice has breached the confines of the blank page to be etched on every available surface. The Far Outside poet famously left her poems–largely unread by hungry eyes of the 19th Century, other than a lucky editor of a literary magazine–tied in little...
David Buuck & Juliana Spahr: The Side Effect

David Buuck & Juliana Spahr: The Side Effect

She had done what she usually did. Upon arrival at her office, she turned on all her machines, the lights and the computer and the recording devices and the printer, and then proceeded to go through the new stack of forms, along with the student papers, the administrative emails, the healthcare forms, the websites, blogs,...

Christine Shan Shan Hou: Three Poems

Sugar On Fruit is an Untidy Wish If only I could grow upward, I would never drown. A kite rich, penny-pinch. Some salad to suck it all in tremendously. A sinking belly turned upside down is a rising whale. There are allergies in all tree pollen and wanting. My disguise sat with me closely that...
Books of the year: A few of my favorite things

Books of the year: A few of my favorite things

Here are a few of my favorite things from the past year. The list doesn’t represent the best books–it can’t–I haven’t read all the books! It represents books that stuck with me. That I would buy and give and happily have on my shelves. I’m adding a note about gift appeal at the end of...

Jon Paul Fiorentino: The Unfriending

You did a real stupid thing there for your career when you unfriended me. A real stupid thing. I’m establishing a movement. I recently exceeded 5000 friends. 5000. Real. Friends. Your lack of civility when it comes to open discourse astounds me. I can end you. I once made a quip that amused a very...
Shane Rhodes On Beauty

Shane Rhodes On Beauty

Welcome back to “On Beauty,” a series of interviews with poets about their relations to beauty.  For an introduction to the project, see poets on beauty. This month I invited Shane Rhodes to think about beauty.  At a reading from his new poetry book, X, which interrogates documents outlining Canada’s “Indian Policy,” he mentioned that...

Jake Kennedy on Claire Donato & David Wolach: Burial + Hospitalogy

Burial, Claire Donato. Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2013. Hospitalogy, David Wolach. Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2013. by Jake Kennedy Out of Lispector (possibilities/impossibilities of form)… out of Woolf (some kind of ruthless charting of suffering)… out of Waldrop (a crystalline philosophy of images)… here comes—with power—CD and her debut poemnovel Burial, particularly: a narrator’s lush, extended interior...

Colin Fulton on Roger Farr’s IKMQ

IKMQ, Roger Farr. New Star Books, 2012 By Colin Fulton I may be repeating myself here, but everybody loves Ludwig Wittgenstein. Between Johanna Drucker and Jan Zwicky (and that’s quite the between), there have been hundreds of works of poetry and poetry criticism that find their substance in direct reference to or mediations on the ideas...
Geneviève Robichaud in Conversation with Benjamin Klein: "Fabrications" a Pop-Up Show

Geneviève Robichaud in Conversation with Benjamin Klein: “Fabrications” a Pop-Up Show

Geneviève Robichaud (GR): You’re curating a Pop-up group show with Margot Ross. What is the show’s intention? What was the curatorial frame/aim? How did you choose the work? Benjamin Klein (BK): The artists in the show titled ‘Fabrications’ are Laura Anderson, David Arseneau, Pierre Julien, Mathieu Levesque, Simone Rochon and Jonathan Schouela. The space (a warehouse...
Justin Herrmann: The Brothel War

Justin Herrmann: The Brothel War

I was taken to a brothel a few times when I was thirteen and lived in a small town in Texas near the Mexican border. I had a friend, Bill Howard, whose dad was somehow or another involved in the Mexican radio industry and would meet business associates across the border at a place called...
Alex Porco in Conversation with David O'Meara

Alex Porco in Conversation with David O’Meara

Stitched Songs (7 Sept 2013 – 6 Nov 2013)   Alex Porco (AP): David, in your new book, A Pretty Sight (Coach House, 2013), the classical rhapsode is a central, recurring figure. The rhapsode is a figure of transport: he has the expressive power to move— or “possess”— his audience; at the same time, the rhapsode...
Elee Kraljii Gardiner: A Poem

Elee Kraljii Gardiner: A Poem

Elee Kraljii Gardiner directs Thursdays Writing Collective and is coeditor with John Asfour of V6A: Writing from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside(Arsenal Pulp Press, 2012), which was shortlisted for the 2012 City of Vancouver Book Award. She is also the editor of six books from the Collective, most recently The Stanza Project (Otter Press, 2013), an investigation of the intersection of architectural...

Max Bledstein on Omari Newton’s Sal Capone

Sal Capone: The Lamentable Tragedy of, a play by Omari Newton. MAI Centre, Montreal, 2013. By Max Bledstein The history of racial relations in North America has certainly been a topic of interest amongst filmmakers and playwrights in recent years, and one in which audiences have been happy to engage them. One need look no further...
Vol. 7 Contents

Vol. 7 Contents

Get cozy Lemon Hounders, this issue is brimming with FABULOUS content: including an interview with David O’Meara, poetry by Lisa Cattrone, an excerpt from Shelagh Plunkett’s memoir, as well as critical writing on Margaret Christakos, Marianne Boruch and Masha Tupitsyn. And so much MORE!!! Also stay tuned: we’ll be adding tones of HOT new content...
Eliot D'Silva on Geoffrey G. O'Brien's People on Sunday

Eliot D’Silva on Geoffrey G. O’Brien’s People on Sunday

People on Sunday, Geoffrey G. O’Brien. Wave Books, 2013. By Eliot D’Silva This is the problem staged in “Hesiod”, a poem towards the middle of Geoffrey G. O’Brien’s People on Sunday, the latest of his four collections. The book is written out of that negative space – also a span of time – across which...
Alan Reed on Michèle Bernstein & Everyone Agrees: La Nuit + After the Night

Alan Reed on Michèle Bernstein & Everyone Agrees: La Nuit + After the Night

All the King’s Horses, Michèle Bernstein. Trans. John Kelsey. Semiotext(e), 2008. The Night, Michèle Bernstein. Trans. Clodagh Kinsella, Ed. by Everyone Agrees. Book Works, 2013. After the Night, Everyone Agrees. Book Works, 2013. By Alan Reed   1. All the King’s Horses and The Night Michèle Bernstein is one of the founding members of the Situationist...