LEMON HOUND

More Bite Than Bark Since 2005
Monthly archive March, 2010

Ok Go: This Too Shall Pass

A special send out to all the stressed-out academics and any others who feel beleagured in these early spring days….. This video makes me fucking happy. In another iteration, Nikki Reimer played in marching bands for 3 1/2 years and hated nearly every minute of it, but she is still tickled by Ok Go and...

Waiting on Warmth

Really would like spring to come now. Thanks.

“the way books feel in our hands” : Nikki Reimer

Or, indie girl embraces the retrograde. (a meditation on the future of the publishing industry) —- In 1991 Nikki Reimer turned to the girl beside her in math class and confessed her love for the smell of new books.

Someone Stole my Kenny Goldsmith poster

Which is probably a logical theft. If one can call it a theft. After all, the poster was on my door. The door, in a sense, is public property. It is facing out, into the corridor, and the corridor is a passing through. Granted it is still “my” door, so far as I am contracted...

Suspension, evasion, and inversion: a conversation with Ken Babstock

Now anyone reading this will immediately recognize the attendant risks, and I think it’s an old debate that won’t be resolved anytime soon; I can maybe dramatize how it has played out in my own work. Your own formulation, “if I could remove myself by half,” points toward the predicament really effectively. What I mean...

Movie Review: “The Hollywood Librarian”

http://www.hollywoodlibrarian.com/ If it’s true that dentists are the most chronically depressed professionals, there may be a strong chance that librarians are the happiest. “The Hollywood Librarian,” presents interviews from a number of librarians in a variety of fields, each giving a slightly different image of the importance and role of librarianship in the United States....

What do you want?

For the slave’s discourse, being essentially only reiterative, grinds the discourse of discourse to a halt. It is the mock in the mirror, the discourse that, like Echo herself, continuously throws back to the questioner the zero-institution question: “what do you want?” Vanessa Place

In the future comment streams will be neutral

And optimism shall reign. The Torontoist’s Book Page and Vox Populism Present: THE OPTIMISMS PROJECT: A National Poetry Month Thing -we’d like to cobble together 30 or so poets, all under the age of 30, and give them some space (100-150 words) to express, in whatever way they choose, what makes them feel optimistic about...

Who is to say? I’m so totally unhip, uncool, and apparently out to lunch

What’s missing from this discussion is experience, time, context, distance…who is to say what is making a thing, or nothing happen? Who is to say what is making meaning? Who or what will hold up? Who is to say what comfort is? Who is to say? It seems everyone is too close to the mirror...

Canada has no unseemly competition?

….all Canadian poets of merit are awarded a large annual stipend. We got universal health care; we keep our poets fed. Our top ranking poets are granted official government positions. Like Neruda, we get to be ambassadors and attaches and that sort of stuff… Seriously. I found that comment in the box after Jim Behrle’s...

All sides now: a correspondence with Lisa Robertson

LR: I’ve always been completely seduced by sentences, certainly. I think I’m a sentence-lover before I’m a writer. Much of my earlier work has been testing the internal structure of sentences as wildly psycho-sexual-social units. But here I wanted to find a way to include extremely banal, flat, overwrought and bad sentences, by devising a...

On Reviewing: Ken Babstock

LH: What do you think the purpose of a review is? If you also write about books on a blog, why? What does blogging let you do differently? KB: Being a late arrival to this conversation I have to preface my answers by underlining how much I’ve enjoyed the bewildering array of previous respondents. Much...

Nine-to-Fiving It

http://hr.osu.edu/resources/archive/08_spring/article_adjustments.aspx Throughout my academic poetry training, my cohorts and I were encouraged to identify our unique or idiosyncratic areas of knowledge, and to write about them. Obsessed with Mongolia? Got zombies on the brain? Have a thing for Victorian woodcuts? We were taught that the topics we had the most specialised knowledge of would make...

CD Wright

I need a new camera, I know. The one I currently use came from a gumball machine. It has a mind of its own and erased the contents of my last trip to New York. Still, I like to take photos of poets reading and I use what’s at hand. What am I looking for?...

please thank the maker of your choice for the internet: Nikki Reimer

Sometimes I hate the internet for its myriad of treasures, distractions and wormholes. Other times, like this week for example, it provides me with helpful links and tips when I’ve been too busy to write a proper post. Interesting poetic divergences of the day include: -a new downloadable poetry chapbook by Jordan Scott (via derek...

Thinking about “Limited” Fork Poetics

Thinking about Thylias MossSong of Iota (some Limited Fork Theory birth history) by forkergirl) [low-res]

Re-Framing the Page

While frantically pawing through the shelves of my local Chindigo in search of a last minute gift, I hit a shelf of books about making books. Though I rarely suffer attacks of greed while shopping for others, these books inspired in me such a ravenous, consumeristic desire that it took my Mum 15 minutes to...

To Sonnet, to Son-net, Tuscon Net

So yes, the Jackpine Sonnet. “The fiddle’s incomplete without the dance,” Acorn writes, “Let’s hook fingers to complete.” Without some kind of constraint, verse Acorn suggests lacks luster, and in general, I would agree. There is little sign of a struggle, perhaps. Form or constraint puts pressure on the idea behind the poem, on the...

It’s read or be read

I’m turning my facebook friends into fans. I’m going to be the topdog, that’s right, me. I’m the one who’s going to blow all the other dogs out of the water. Trample the tepid and murky shallows of contem-po, oh yah, and it feels good to say…I’m the young upstart baby, and I’m gunning for...

Michael Turner on Expanded Literary Practices in Vancouver: Nikki Reimer

Michael Turner presented a short curatorial talk and slideshow at KSW this afternoon based on his “to show, to give, to make it be there”: Expanded Literary Practices in Vancouver, 1954-1969, on at the SFU (Burnaby) Gallery till March 13. I was one of the event organizers so am unable to give an unbiased or...

What is it you want?

Orson Welles on frozen peas and other fabulously insulting turns of phrase. And here’s one with beef burger: Good Lord, give me leave to be so cranky! Possibly it has something to do with the act of whoring oneself so blatantly:A strangely insightful bit of footage that may or may not have anything to do...

Poems everywhere, even in poems

And so it goes, like nesting dolls, the nesting poems, shrinking and growing out of other poems. The poem as read and appreciated, then the poem unearthed from that poem. Here is a poem gleaned from a poem I read online recently. With apologies and thanks for the inspiration to the author. Any guesses as...

Poetry podcasts, online resources, oh and introducing Canada a wee bit more

Avant-Garde All the Time with Kenneth Goldsmith is chock full of amazing discoveries. Particularly the two recent “women of the avant-garde” with offerings such as “Turtle Dreams” from Meredith Monk, a Lydia Lunch flashback, a young, young, Patti Smith, balladeer Helen Adam. Some excellent new finds for me include Judy Dunaway, a woman who composes...

Friday found file

Ginsberg on the breath

Sachiko Murakami: The Toronto New School of Writing

I’ve been run off my feet this week. After a bout of the stomach illness that seems to be bugging Toronto, and then being hit by a car on Friday (nothing broken but my spirit!), I was laid up and now I’m playing catch up. Today is particularly hectic, and right in the middle of...

Literary Sleaze (Part 3 of 3)

Experimental writers in Calgary are pretty lucky. In my experience, the avant-garde writers here are supportive and inclusive, and the critical climate is constructive. This is not the case for all writing communities, however. Canada is home to a few vocal writers who seem to believe that the role of the critic is not to...

Of Grief & Poetry

There is a lot of grief in your poetry someone said after my reading in Victoria last week. I have been reflecting on this, more so since upon arrival in Vancouver the following day I was met with news that my brother passed away. This is the fourth death in my immediate family in the...

Nikki Reimer: on erasure and erasure and erasure

Alex Leslie and Elizabeth Bachinsky’s Blackout at the Candahar erasure project has got us all thinking about the poetics of erasure over here, so it seemed like a good time to pull Radi os off the shelf and give it a whirl. In 1976, in the storied tradition of erasure poetics, Ronald Johnson pulled an...

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