Pulled off my shelves #6: “O, though I love what others do abhor”

Last week I discussed authors who craft their work entirely through erasure—erasing the majority of another writer’s oeuvre, leaving select words in place which form a new poetry. Those poets…

The Question of Appropriation or the Anxiety of Influence, in Either Case, Merely Scratching the Surface

On August 31, 2010 at 12:44 am New Orleanian wrote: In New Orleans we say We ain’t studyin’ about you On August 19, 2010 at 3:13 pm Sheera Talpaz wrote:…

Pulled off my shelves #5: “Compose the Holes”

In my 3rd “pulled off my shelves” column I discussed authors who produce work which consists of nothing but punctuation marks. These authors—typified by Goldsmith, Reuterswärd, Boglione and others—isolate the…

Pulled off my shelves #4: “Besides, it’s always other people who die”

In my most recent “Pulled off my shelves” column I discussed poems and novels written without the use of any letters or words; those novels which consist entirely of punctuation.…

Pulled off my shelves #3: “There are some punctuations that are interesting and there are some punctuations that are not.”

In the various anthologies and publications of concrete and visual poetry I have piling up, its not particularly surprising to find visual poets who are intrigued by the graphic possibilities…

Pulled off my Shelves #2: bill bissett’s Rush: what fuckan theory: a study uv language.

bill bissett’s work—for the past several decades—has been problematic. His lyrical voice is complicated by his complex idiosyncratic orthography. His concrete poetry intersperses dense typewriter-driven grid pieces with diagrams of…

Pulled off my shelves #1: Alison Turnbull’s Spring Snow—A Translation (London: Book Works, 2002)

Thank you Sina for bringing me aboard lemonhound— I’m excited to be involved. This “pulled from my shelves” series will be my weekly exploration of concrete and conceptual books which…

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