Damian Rogers on Suzanne Buffam’s “The Irrationalist”

A few months ago, a friend’s father challenged me to defend poetry as a product in the marketplace — the demand left me sputtering about art, the relative insignificance of…

Pulled off my shelves #6: “O, though I love what others do abhor”

Last week I discussed authors who craft their work entirely through erasure—erasing the majority of another writer’s oeuvre, leaving select words in place which form a new poetry. Those poets…

The Question of Appropriation or the Anxiety of Influence, in Either Case, Merely Scratching the Surface

On August 31, 2010 at 12:44 am New Orleanian wrote: In New Orleans we say We ain’t studyin’ about you On August 19, 2010 at 3:13 pm Sheera Talpaz wrote:…

Pulled off my shelves #5: “Compose the Holes”

In my 3rd “pulled off my shelves” column I discussed authors who produce work which consists of nothing but punctuation marks. These authors—typified by Goldsmith, Reuterswärd, Boglione and others—isolate the…

Quickly: Less than Tweets with George Murray

A whole lot of blogging goodness, originally uploaded by lemon hound. LH: What is the shortest aphorism in your collection? GM: (Gosh, I don’t know.) Known to man? Jesus wept?…

Pulled off my shelves #4: “Besides, it’s always other people who die”

In my most recent “Pulled off my shelves” column I discussed poems and novels written without the use of any letters or words; those novels which consist entirely of punctuation.…

Pulled off my shelves #3: “There are some punctuations that are interesting and there are some punctuations that are not.”

In the various anthologies and publications of concrete and visual poetry I have piling up, its not particularly surprising to find visual poets who are intrigued by the graphic possibilities…

Melissa Bull: Two Poems, Six Questions

EDISTO In the truck my roast pink mother floats in a piggy nightgown from the Piggly-Wiggly. She’s drinking piña colada. I’ve got corn mash or some kind of corny nosto-industrialized…

Pulled off my Shelves #2: bill bissett’s Rush: what fuckan theory: a study uv language.

bill bissett’s work—for the past several decades—has been problematic. His lyrical voice is complicated by his complex idiosyncratic orthography. His concrete poetry intersperses dense typewriter-driven grid pieces with diagrams of…

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